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Friday, August 1, 2014   2:51 AM   |   80°F

Medicine

UT HSC Screens Ed. Video for CA-MRSA

Earlier in July, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio received a CTSA (Clinical Translational Science Award) Community Engagement Project Award from the South Central Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine for their 12-minute educational video to improve awareness of the skin staph infection CA-MRSA.

According to the UTHSC website, “The primary goal of this project was to promote the role of librarians as partners with CTSA-funded researchers in production of community focused educational materials.  Partnering with librarians on the project were researchers from the Pharmacotherapy Education & Research Center and the South Central Area Health Education Center.”

View the short film here: MRSA the Movie: It’s Not a Spider Bite! 

Gaming & Improving Hypertension Outcomes

Circulation: cardiovascular quality and outcomes has a pre-print article that’s making the news. A Harvard developed an email based game that quizzes participants on the best ways to treat hypertension. The game is offered via QStream, a Harvard based tech company which offers educational programs.

While the LSUHSC Libraries do purchase a subscription to the listed journal, this particular article is available for free to the general public.

Essay Contest for Louisiana Youth

The Office of Community and Minority Health Education at LSUHSC School of Medicine is now accepting entries for their essay contest: “What does being healthy mean to me?” The goal of this contest is to allow the children of South Louisiana “to exercise their natural inquisitive nature in exploring health and healthcare policy issues.”

Entries postmarked no later than May 9, 2014 will be accepted and the winners announced on May 17, 2014. First place winner will receive $750; second place winner will receive $500; third place winner will receive $250.

For eligibility and entry guidelines on words count requirements, submission address, judging breakdown, and contest entry form, please refer to http://www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu/essaycontest/.

An informational video has also been posted on YouTube:

Sponsors for this contest include the LSU Healthcare Network in partnership with LiveWell Louisiana and Winn-Dixie.

E-Cigarettes – Poisoning Children?

As someone who took a puff on her Dad’s pipe as a kid (to my everlasting regret), this study shouldn’t be a surprise…

The CDC is reporting a huge increase in the number of phone calls to poison control centers involving e-cigarettes and children under the age of 5. Liquid nicotine to the eye doesn’t sound good.

CDC Infographic

CDC Infographic

New Carville Leprosarium Video

The AOL education series, What Remains has released a new video (less than 5 minutes) on the National Hansen’s Disease Center Museum in Carville, Louisiana. The video was filmed in December 2013.

The Libraries partnered with the Hansens’ Disease Museum in 2011 to digitize the patient newsletter, the Star to make it more widely available to researchers.

Introducing VisualDx: A New Tool for Clinicians

Thanks to the School of Medicine Office of Student Technology, LSUHSC now has access to a new web-based clinical application designed to aid in visual diagnosis and patient education.

VisualDx?á allows point-of-care assistance for the user. The differential builder, diagnosis search, and medication search provide the information necessary to compare symptoms, visual cues, diagnosis, and treatment options. The VisualDx image bank contains over 25,000 medical images of diseases of the skin, hair, nails, eyes, lungs, etc. and shows variations by age, skin type, and stage.

You can watch a video overview of the application here:?áhttp://www.visualdx.com/features/video-overview.

Access to VisualDx is currently available through August 2014 for use on campus as well as off-campus for those with remote access privileges.?áSupported browsers are Internet Explorer 7+, Google Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. VisualDx also supports mobile wireless devices with a 3G or 4G connection.

It’s AcWriMo 2013!

Inspired by the hugely successful NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), PhD2Published, a blog dedicated to helping academics publish, has announced that November is also AcWriMo (Academic Writing Month).

AcWriMo is a month long academic write-a-thon for academics at all stages of their careers. ?áPhD2Published will support writers with dedicated posts about academic writing and thousands of Tweets to encourage you to keep going throughout the month.

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According to their website:

“There are 6 basic rules:

1. Decide on your goal. You might count words, hours put in or projects achieved ÔÇô itÔÇÖs up to you. But try and push yourself a bit. (And if you need help counting our?áPhDometer app?áÔÇô the proceeds from which help fund this month-long writing extravaganza ÔÇô was designed for just that!)

2. Declare it! Basically, just sign up on the?áAcWriMo 2013 Writing Accountability Spreadsheet?áand fill in the sections on what youÔÇÖd like to achieve by the end of the month. Being accountable is key to this working for you. You need to feel a bit of pressure to get the work done. So sign up and add your goals as soon as you can.

3. Draft a strategy. DonÔÇÖt start AcWriMo without doing a bit of planning and preparation. Get some reading done, carve out time slots in your schedule to dedicate to writing, even buy your favorite coffee. Sort out whatever youÔÇÖll need to write, and get it done now, there wonÔÇÖt be time when November comes around.

4. Discuss your progress. OK so being on Twitter and Facebook with us all day isn’t acceptable ÔÇô you’ve got work to do ÔÇô but checking-in at certain times is really important! We want to know how youÔÇÖre getting on? What is working for you and what isn’t? Do you need help? Do you want to share a writing triumph? (YouÔÇÖll find most discussion about AcWriMo on Twitter using the?á#AcWriMo?áhashtag, but if?áFacebook?áis more your thing, go there. Or use your own blog to keep in touch. You can even write little updates you want to share in the?áspreadsheet.)

5. DonÔÇÖt slack off. As participant Bettina said of the first AcWriMo, you must ÔÇÿwrite like thereÔÇÖs no December!ÔÇÖ If you push yourself, youÔÇÖll quickly discover the tips and techniques that work best for YOU and thatÔÇÖll save you even more time in the long-run.

6. Declare your results. ItÔÇÖs great to use the spreadsheet everyday (or as often as you can) to chart how youÔÇÖre getting on, but even if you canÔÇÖt do that, you MUST announce your results at the end of the month. Our writing community benefits not only from sharing in your achievements, but knowing what didn’t work and being reminded that, at the end of the day, weÔÇÖre all human!”

So everyone should go forth and WRITE… That’s what I’ll be doing this month!

Library Talk on 1930s New Orleans Medicine

Former journalist Martha Holoubek Fitzgerald, author of The Courtship of Two Doctors: A 1930s Love Story of Letters, Hope & Healing, will discuss ÔÇ£Charity the Beautiful and Hen Medics: An InsiderÔÇÖs Look at 1930s New Orleans MedicineÔÇØ at an upcoming event.

LSU Health Sciences Center Library has the book and other related materials in its archives.

When: Saturday September 28 @ 10am

Where: 219 Loyola Ave, New Orleans Public Library

Brought to you by the LSU Medical Alumni Association and the New Orleans Public Library

 

For more info visit: https://www.lsuhsc.edu/events/docs/FitzgeraldTalk.pdf

 

This Month in History: Putting Mind over Matter

Ever been hypnotized? While it may not make you cluck like a chicken, as an alternative therapy, medical hypnosis might help you manage and overcome a number of physical and mental conditions. In the fall of 1959, a few brave medical students were willing to put their bodies and minds at the mercy of LSU Medical School Professor of psychiatry Dr. Carl L. Davis for the purpose of studying the viability of hypnotherapy. Later, the students would be given the opportunity to reverse the stakes and hypnotize Dr. Davis in the spirit of fairness.

The American Medical Association officially backed medical hypnosis for wide use in 1958, though they cautioned against using the method as a form of entertainment and in cases of severe psychological illness. At that time, medical and dental practices used hypnotherapy as a form of anesthesia and in the management of pain. Other fields of medicine that have found use for hypnotherapeutic procedure include dermatology, gastroenterology, cardiology, obstetrics, oncology, post-surgery recovery, and even in the treatment of smoking addiction, eating disorders, and psychosomatic illness through age regression.

While many remain skeptical about the efficacy of hypnotherapy, it is true that more research and standardization of practice will provide insight into the relative benefits and risks of its usage. Dangers to the patient and the doctor are a considerable cause for concern. The mind, being a vast and complex entity, requires a delicate but firm touch. Hypnotism provides the therapist with the ability to wield the power of suggestion over the patient, and so puts the receptive patient in a vulnerable position. For this reason, the move toward more holistic treatment of the individual is vital in addressing his or her needs.

A 1959 Times-Picayune article relates the case of a man who developed asthma every time his mother-in-law would announce her intention to visitÔÇöÔÇ£This man just cannot understand why this would happen since he honestly believes he is fond of [her].ÔÇØ This is an example of a symptom that could possibly benefit from hypnotherapy (or else a nice, long vacation).

Accounts of hypnotism can turn grim, however. In another instance, a patient suffering from self-destructive tendencies developed paralysis in one of her fingers. She was referred to a hypnotist, who alleviated the symptom without addressing the underlying psychological turmoil. Upon release, the woman promptly employed her newly-flexible trigger finger in one final act of self-harm. This is an extreme example, but speaks to the necessity of treating the patient as a whole and of recognizing links between physical and mental manifestations of illness.

The prominent physicians mentioned in these newspaper articles were Professors of psychiatry at LSU Medical School: Dr. Carl L. Davis, Dr. Lucio Gatto, and Dr. Charles Watkins, who also served as the Head of the department. All of them make a few appearances in our Digital Collections as subject and even creator. Dr. Davis appears for his addresses on teen drinking and middle-age rebellion. Dr. Gatto appears for his study on compulsive borrowing. Dr. Watkins is the most prolific figure for his interest in the history of the U. S. Army 64th General Hospital, which has its own Collection, as well as for his medical-cultural mission to Central America, and his role in the care (and commitment) of former Governor Earl K. Long.

Now a far cry from its historic roots in mesmerism and animal magnetism, the current practice of medical hypnosis can be aligned more closely with deep meditation and positive thinking, the power of which is widely acknowledged by doctors and patients alike.

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the Louisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

 

1921 Cancer Prevention Film Digitized by NLM

Quack Cure Refuted!

 

Summer 2013 saw the launch of a new digital collection from the National Library of Medicine, Medical Movies on the Web. The first item added to this collection is the Reward of Courage which is a silent film produced by the American Society for the Control of Cancer (which would become the ?áAmerican Cancer Society). Read more about the film at Circulating Now, an informational website from the History of Medicine Division of NLM.

 

As of this moment, the collection only includes 4 titles, but one of them is directed by and stars Gene Kelly! The 1945 Combat Fatigue Irritability?áis just over 35 minutes long. Despite it’s matter of fact name, the NLM information?ásays it “is one of the best military productions of the war. It features a good script, score, editing, direction, and superb acting by an uncredited cast…”

 

This Month in History: Don’t Just Grin and Bear It

“A woman’s first responsibility is to make an effort to do what she wants to do.” –sage advice?áfrom?áDr. Winston Weese, Emeritus Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at LSU Medical School

You never know what you will chance upon when you browse the LibraryÔÇÖs Newspaper Clippings Collection. Trolling for this monthÔÇÖs topic took me on a journey through various strange perspectives on womenÔÇÖs health.

In 1959, convention speakers discussed ÔÇ£gyno-psychiatry,ÔÇØ ÔÇ£a very basic and superficial type of psychiatry [that] is primarily reassurance. Sometimes a woman is infertile because she believes her husband does not love her. Or vice versa. What we are trying to do today is to make the infertile woman realize that help is possible: that they donÔÇÖt have to just grin and bear it.ÔÇØ One article from 1961 blames men for womenÔÇÖs anxieties: ÔÇ£The American man isnÔÇÖt asserting his male dominance.ÔÇØ The piece is full of quotable gems like, ÔÇ£The wise woman of course, vocally credits her husband with leadership even when he does not have itÔÇØ and ÔÇ£boosts her husbandÔÇÖs ego even though she may be far superior to him in intelligence.ÔÇØ

Some answered the call for by entering the medical field.?áIn 1931, The Southern Medical Association fielded questions about the rise of women as doctors. At the time, women doctors still combated some suppositions about their patients: ÔÇ£Why should they be all women?ÔÇØ and about their personhood with ÔÇ£frequent assertions that such professions as social work and medicine destroy many of the gentler attributes of the feminine nature.ÔÇØ One of the doctors interviewed was the remarkable Dr. Moss of New Orleans, who said, ÔÇ£ThatÔÇÖs a lot of foolishness on the part of people who donÔÇÖt know us.ÔÇØ

Dr. Emma Sadler Moss rejected a teaching career because she was ÔÇ£not gentle enoughÔÇØ and stood as is a?áshining example?áof a woman doing what she wants. She brushed aside the hackneyed image of the young, gentle Southern woman, preferring the allure of the medical profession, where she excelled. After a stint as a medical technologist, Dr. Moss studied for her M. D., which she earned in 1935 from LSU. From there, she earned the title of Director of Pathology at Charity Hospital, clinical professor of pathology at LSU Medical School, and President of the American Society of Clinical Pathology (notably, the first woman President of the society).

Dr. MossÔÇÖ commitment to these institutions lasted for over thirty years until her death in 1970. She received numerous awards for her work in pathology including being recognized as the 1954 Medical Woman of the Year and as one of ÔÇ£The Six Most Successful Women of 1955.ÔÇØ The Library owns two editions of her lauded text, An Atlas of Medical Mycology, which she co-authored with Dr. Albert Louis McQuown. A full listing of her contributions to LSU Medical School and Charity Hospital can be viewed in A History of LSU School of Medicine New Orleans.

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the?áLouisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

Blow Guns & Teenage Boys

National Public Radio (NPR) reported yesterday on a?áPediatrics eFirstarticle. Teen boys are finding blow gun direction on the internet and accidentally inhaling the darts. Over three months, the same Ohio hospital had three patients with issues.

On a similar note, the?áCenters for Disease Control?á(CDC) released statistics in June about regarding Homemade Chemical Bomb Incidents.

Link to the Pediatrics full-text is available to LSUHSC faculty, staff & students. It can be accessed off-campus with a valid LSUHSC library barcode & PIN. You can find more information at our remote access webpage. Link to the USMMWR is available to anyone as a government publication.

Rowena Spencer at age 91

Retired faculty member Rowena Spencer is back in the American Medical Student Association blog, On Call, on the occasion of her 91st birthday which will be July 3rd.

Free NOLA CARE Clinic with Volunteer Opportunities

On Wednesday, July 3rd from 8 am to 9 pm, the National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics (NAFC)?áwill host a one day free medical clinic?áat the Morial Convention Center. The clinic is still seeking medical (and non-medical) volunteers, including physicians, nurses, and students in those fields.

LSUHSC & MDA/ALS Clinic

In light of the online firestorm?á(story from?áNOLA.com & the Gambit online)?áthat erupted this morning because some Atlanta talk show DJs made fun of Steve Gleason’s ALS diagnosis, it’s worth mentioning that LSUHSC became one of 44 Muscular Dystrophy Association certified clinics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy (MD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The clinic is the first of its kind in Louisiana.