Medicine

The Medical Letter online

The Library is pleased to announce that we now have The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics online.

The Medical Letter, Inc. is a non-profit organization whose goal is to provide unbiased drug information.  The Medical Letter does not accept advertising, grants, or donations from any outside source, and it is solely supported by subscription fees.  The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics was first published in 1959.  The online collection begins in 1988 with v.30.  The Library’s print collection includes v.1 (1959) – v.56 (2014).  The Medical Letter includes peer-reviewed, evidence-based drug information, CMEs, and 2 ebooks: Handbook of Antimicrobial Therapy and Drugs for Parasitic Infections.

Access is available on campus, as well as off campus by logging in through the Library’s remote access proxy, WAM.  There is also an app available from Apple’s App Store, Google Play, and Amazon’s App Store for Android after registering on the Medical Letter’s web site.

The Medical Letter has generously donated access for our university at no charge for one year.

Resources for Recent Public Health Emergencies!

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) recently developed resource lists for three public health emergencies affecting both local and global communities. An incident Web page was created to gather resources on the emerging health issues arising from the Zika Virus and two PDF documents on recent chemical incidents have been updated.

Links to these resources are listed below and are also available on the NLM Disaster Health home page: https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov.

Further information is available from two recent NN/LM PSR NewsBits postings:

http://nnlm.gov/psr/newsbits/2016/01/27/selected-zika-virus-health-information-resources-compiled-by-nlm/ http://nnlm.gov/psr/newsbits/2016/01/14/resources-for-aliso-canyon-natural-gas-methane-leak/.

Zika Virus Health Information Resources: https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/zikavirus.html

Aliso Canyon/Porter Ranch Gas Leak: https://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/aliso_canyon_gas_leak.pdf

Lead in Flint, Michigan Water System: https://sis.nlm.nih.gov/enviro/FlintLeadWater.pdf

CDC – Bring Your Brave

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We’re almost half way through breast cancer awareness month. Bring Your Brave is a new campaign focusing on young women with breast cancer. While breast cancer usually effects women over the age of 45, it does occur in about 11% of younger women. Breast cancer can be hereditary however that’s not always the case. There are ways you can reduce your risk of getting breast cancer such as limiting your alcohol intake, maintaining a healthy weight and breastfeeding.

Breast cancer symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • Lump in the breast or underarm/armpit area
  • Thickening or swelling of part of the breast.
  • Redness or flaky skin in the nipple area or the breast.
  • Nipple discharge other than breast milk, including blood.

It is important to get screened if you notice any symptoms early on, in order to start fighting back sooner than later.

For more information, visit:

http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/young_women/bringyourbrave/index.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/resources/features/breastcancerawareness/

DRAW IT TO KNOW IT – NEUROANATOMY now available!

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The LSUHSC-New Orleans Libraries are pleased to announce that we now have access to the self-directed, alternative learning program, Draw It To Know It – Neuroanatomy.  Our access to Draw It To Know It (DITKI) is available through our subscription to STAT!Ref.

This interactive and hands-on learning tool includes narrated video tutorials, practice exams, a brain atlas, and muscle-nerve correlations.  Each tutorial includes notes, questions, and the drawing tool.

Registration must be initiated on campus in order to authenticate your access on our institutional site license. Once your account has been created, you will also be able to access this resource off campus.

To register for an account on campus:

  • Log in to the STAT!Ref database.
  • Scroll down until you see the Draw It To Know It link and click on it:DITKI-snag5
  • Click where it says CLICK HERE FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION…:

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  • Fill out the online registration making sure to use your lsuhsc.edu email account.
  • After you receive the email confirmation from Draw It To Know It, you are ready to go!
  • Access Draw It To Know It through our STAT!Ref database or by going directly to the Draw It To Know It web site: http://drawittoknowit.com/.
  • Access is also available using an Apple iPhone or iPad. The app is available for free at the iTunes site. You must be registered with Draw It To Know It in order to use the app.

We hope you find this new resource helpful in your studies!

Drug Resistant Lice Not in Louisiana, yet…

Whew..Thanks for the information from Janice Nugent, MD, MSN, School of Medicine.

http://www.fox8live.com/clip/11789457/drug-resistance-lice

PubMed changes

Recently, PubMed has announced that it has changed a few popular features that you may notice in your search results:

Within the article summary display, two changes have been made.  The term “Related Citations” has been changed to “Similar Articles”.  It was thought that “Related Citations” was ambiguous.,  The algorithm to generate the results of a search on for similar articles has not changed, just the name of the feature.  Also, the status tag line has been removed from the article summary display.  Most users will not notice this change but experienced searchers may.  The status tag line is still included in the Abstract display.

pm_related_citations_feature_renamed_fig1

The “Save Search” link for creating My NCBI email alerts has been renamed “Create alert” and the “RSS” link has been renamed “Create RSS”.  Once again, these changes will not affect the functionality of PubMed they are only intended to eliminate ambiguity and to make the process smoother.

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Finally, for those who use PubMed Mobile, there have been updates with a number of styling modifications and additional enhancements including a “Trending articles” feature.

For more information about these changes, you can refer to the New and Noteworthy link on the bottom of the PubMed screen or refer to the NLM Technical Bulletin.

 

Hyperbaric – Brain Injury Trial in the News

Dr. Paul Harch‘s latest clinical trial on the effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatments on brain injured patients is in the news. The study is seeking 50 patients to undergo 40 treatments.

 

CDC & Healthy Holidays

The CDC wants us to have a Healthy Holiday season…so they posted a webpage and a podcast and three e-cards (1, 2, 3) and …a song, sung to the tune of the 12 Days of Christmas. (The song is also featured in card 1.)

Enjoy!

1949 US Public Health Service Film on Diabetes

Thanks to Circulating Now, NLM’s historical blog, I learned about the Story of Wendy Hill, created by the US Public Health Service in 1949.

Happy National Diabetes Month!

UT HSC Screens Ed. Video for CA-MRSA

Earlier in July, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio received a CTSA (Clinical Translational Science Award) Community Engagement Project Award from the South Central Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine for their 12-minute educational video to improve awareness of the skin staph infection CA-MRSA.

According to the UTHSC website, “The primary goal of this project was to promote the role of librarians as partners with CTSA-funded researchers in production of community focused educational materials.  Partnering with librarians on the project were researchers from the Pharmacotherapy Education & Research Center and the South Central Area Health Education Center.”

View the short film here: MRSA the Movie: It’s Not a Spider Bite! 

Gaming & Improving Hypertension Outcomes

Circulation: cardiovascular quality and outcomes has a pre-print article that’s making the news. A Harvard developed an email based game that quizzes participants on the best ways to treat hypertension. The game is offered via QStream, a Harvard based tech company which offers educational programs.

While the LSUHSC Libraries do purchase a subscription to the listed journal, this particular article is available for free to the general public.

Essay Contest for Louisiana Youth

The Office of Community and Minority Health Education at LSUHSC School of Medicine is now accepting entries for their essay contest: “What does being healthy mean to me?” The goal of this contest is to allow the children of South Louisiana “to exercise their natural inquisitive nature in exploring health and healthcare policy issues.”

Entries postmarked no later than May 9, 2014 will be accepted and the winners announced on May 17, 2014. First place winner will receive $750; second place winner will receive $500; third place winner will receive $250.

For eligibility and entry guidelines on words count requirements, submission address, judging breakdown, and contest entry form, please refer to http://www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu/essaycontest/.

An informational video has also been posted on YouTube:

Sponsors for this contest include the LSU Healthcare Network in partnership with LiveWell Louisiana and Winn-Dixie.

E-Cigarettes – Poisoning Children?

As someone who took a puff on her Dad’s pipe as a kid (to my everlasting regret), this study shouldn’t be a surprise…

The CDC is reporting a huge increase in the number of phone calls to poison control centers involving e-cigarettes and children under the age of 5. Liquid nicotine to the eye doesn’t sound good.

CDC Infographic

CDC Infographic

New Carville Leprosarium Video

The AOL education series, What Remains has released a new video (less than 5 minutes) on the National Hansen’s Disease Center Museum in Carville, Louisiana. The video was filmed in December 2013.

The Libraries partnered with the Hansens’ Disease Museum in 2011 to digitize the patient newsletter, the Star to make it more widely available to researchers.

Introducing VisualDx: A New Tool for Clinicians

Thanks to the School of Medicine Office of Student Technology, LSUHSC now has access to a new web-based clinical application designed to aid in visual diagnosis and patient education.

VisualDx?á allows point-of-care assistance for the user. The differential builder, diagnosis search, and medication search provide the information necessary to compare symptoms, visual cues, diagnosis, and treatment options. The VisualDx image bank contains over 25,000 medical images of diseases of the skin, hair, nails, eyes, lungs, etc. and shows variations by age, skin type, and stage.

You can watch a video overview of the application here:?áhttp://www.visualdx.com/features/video-overview.

Access to VisualDx is currently available through August 2014 for use on campus as well as off-campus for those with remote access privileges.?áSupported browsers are Internet Explorer 7+, Google Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. VisualDx also supports mobile wireless devices with a 3G or 4G connection.