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Tuesday, July 22, 2014   4:19 AM   |   82°F

Education-technology

Introducing VisualDx: A New Tool for Clinicians

Thanks to the School of Medicine Office of Student Technology, LSUHSC now has access to a new web-based clinical application designed to aid in visual diagnosis and patient education.

VisualDx?á allows point-of-care assistance for the user. The differential builder, diagnosis search, and medication search provide the information necessary to compare symptoms, visual cues, diagnosis, and treatment options. The VisualDx image bank contains over 25,000 medical images of diseases of the skin, hair, nails, eyes, lungs, etc. and shows variations by age, skin type, and stage.

You can watch a video overview of the application here:?áhttp://www.visualdx.com/features/video-overview.

Access to VisualDx is currently available through August 2014 for use on campus as well as off-campus for those with remote access privileges.?áSupported browsers are Internet Explorer 7+, Google Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. VisualDx also supports mobile wireless devices with a 3G or 4G connection.

This Month in History: The Body of Art

As soon as the human body became an object of study and curiosity, art attempted to render it, inside and out. The recreational artist may depict a scene of illness or portraiture, while the specially-commissioned medical artist records anatomical structure and surgical procedure for purposes of instruction, collaboration, and publishing. Well-known pioneers of the modern practice of medical illustration include Leonardo Da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius; their legacy continues well into contemporary culture in tandem with advances in photography and various other image-capturing technology to create a comprehensive visual understanding of medical practice.

LSU Medical School employed its own Medical Arts Department, headed by William Branks Stewart from 1933 until his death in 1950, to observe and document cases as needed. ÔÇ£Would You Like a Portrait of Your Appendix?ÔÇØ asks a Times-Picayune article from 1946–a memorable keepsake, indeed (though you might enjoy this plush version more). Mr. StewartÔÇÖs body of art includes drawings, paintings, photographs, plaster molds, and even animations for use as visual aids in demonstration, in print, and in the classroom. Our Library has made available a digitized collection, aptly named the William Branks Stewart Collection, as a sampling of his works.

Mr. StewartÔÇÖs services were often requested in order to document rare cases and new procedures for later study and review. According to the above article, he would often take the time to familiarize himself with the entire operation in as many as twelve separate instances. A firm understanding of the techniques involved in a procedure and how best to communicate those steps to a student, he found, are necessary skills for the successful medical illustrator. When asked to contextualize his work, Mr. Stewart related his duties to those of an archaeologist with one important difference:” none of them ever had to look down a gastroscope!”

In addition to his professional position as Head of Medical Arts and contributor of drawings to the LSU student-run newspaper, The Tiger, William Branks Stewart was a member of the New Orleans Arts League and the Association of Medical Illustrators. By 1946, he had illustrated eleven textbooks by LSU professors, made plastic prosthetic eyes to replace glass ones, taken moulages (plaster or wax casts) of skin lesions, and even painted names on office doors. He submitted artwork to the Delgado Museum (now the New Orleans Museum of Art), an example of which can be seen here (be sure to take a look at the inscription on the reverse side).

A graduate of the Glasgow School of Arts in Scotland, it appears Mr. Stewart was destined for great things. In a prompted address to readers of The Tiger (page two), he candidly states, “Why did I study art? To make big money? Am I making it? To dodge work? Am I dodging it? Have I failed? No, I am doing something I enjoy, among people I enjoy, and in what I consider to the be most interesting city in America. So what the h—.”

Medical illustrations continue to be of great importance to our students as often photographs alone cannot provide a clear picture of the field under observation. Or, if you are like me, you may appreciate less “icky” renderings of our vicera.

Interested in learning more about the history of medical illustration, art in medicine, or anatomy study? Be sure to take a look at our Library Catalog!

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the Louisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

AMIA Summit on Translational Research

The AMIA (American Medical Informatics Association) summit on Translational Research is March 15-17, 2009 in San Francisco. http://summit2009.amia.org/ Conducted in close partnership with the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), this meeting will be an indispensible gathering for translational bioinformatics research and development worldwide. The abstracts to papers and posters are available for viewing.

Use 2.0 to keep up!

Having trouble keeping up with those journals that are piling up? Don?óÔé¼Ôäót remember where those email reports are about your committee work? Well?óÔé¼?ª..

You can set up your personal Google Reader which accepts RSS feeds to monitor your favorite journals, keep track of your own publications and get notified when someone cites you, and stay up to date with society/association announcements, and your favorite blogs.

Don?óÔé¼Ôäót know what I just said? You should contact a reference librarian reference@lsuhsc.edu immediately. She will assist you in using these 2.0 technologies. This technology will simplify your life. You can wow your kids at the same time! The drawback? Once you get the hang of 2.0 technologies it will be 3.0 technologies!

Shots 2008

Did you know? The CDC postponed publishing updates to the adult immunization schedule until January 2009, but the folks at Group on Immunization Education (GIE) of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine has updated their PDA-friendly immunization schedules. You can also find other resources such as clinical scenarios for teaching, online educational videos, and curricular materials.

http://www.immunizationed.org/

Nintendo makes you skinny. April Fools.. no, wait, really.

No, I’m not talking about the Wii. This summer Nintendo will introduce a new program for the DS system. My Weight Loss Coach comes with a pedometer, mini quizzes and challenges designed to motivate and reward users for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Another reason you need a Wii

Turns out video games aren’t SO bad, at least if you’re planning to be a surgeon. A report from New Scientist magazine posits that surgeons perform better after warming up with Wii, — and that study’s authors are now planning to develop surgery training software for the video game platform.

Read more about it here

Scholarship Opportunity for PDA users

The second-annual Ali Abdulla Al-Ubaydli scholarships for mobile medical computing offer five $1000 Scholarships for Mobile Medical Computing. In addition to academic record, the application requires reading and critically evaluating a piece of the medical literature. Scholars are also be published in the Mobile Medical Computing Reviews journal.

More information

Beat the cheats with this handy chart

Of course we don’t have a problem with plagiarism here at LSUHSC, but it never hurts to be aware of the different software available to detect would-be cheaters. Josh Fischman of The Wired Campus, the Chronicle of Higher Education’s technology blog, reports on a handy chart PDF comparing several anti-plagiarism tools.