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Friday, September 4, 2015   5:32 AM   |   78°F

New Orleans

Timeline Leading to UMCNO

Here’s a quick timeline of the various hospitals grouped together as New Orleans Charity Hospital condensed from John Salvaggio’s History of Charity Hospital (available in print in the Isché Library) with additions since its 1992 publication.

The first Charity Hospital was the provisional Ursuline Convent at Bienville and Chartres in 1736 and was called L’Hospital des Pauvres de la Charité or Hospital of St. John.

The second (built 1743 and destroyed 1779 by hurricane) and third, San Carlos Hospital or Hospital of St. Charles, (built 1785 and destroyed 1809 by fire) hospitals were built near Basin St.

The fourth hospital opened in 1815 at State House Square (Canal, Common, Philippa and Baronne) or roughly the location of the Roosevelt Hotel.

The fifth hospital was completed in 1833 and was designed to house 400 – 550 patients. The Daughters of Charity took over the administration of the hospital in 1834.  A photo of this location from the 1921 resides in the Library Commons.

The sixth hospital (Big Charity) opened its doors in 1939 and closed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

The seventh hospital, the Interim LSU Hospital, functioned from 2006 through 2015.

University Medical Center New Orleans, which opened on August 1st,  is the 8th hospital in a direct line from that first hospital over 275 years ago.

Jazz Fest Parking at the Dental School

In case you missed the email from J. Pegues, Vice Chancellor for Administration:

The New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival will be held at the New Orleans Fairgrounds this weekend (24 – 26 April) and next week (30 April – 03 May).   Dean Henry Gremillion, DDS, has kindly extended an invitation to LSU Health New Orleans faculty, staff, and students to park at the Dental School, space permitting, with their LSUHSC IDs and parking gate cards.  University Police will accommodate entering and exiting through the Tensas Street Gate (the back walk-thru gate) on the above-referenced dates until 7:30 P.M. each day.  After 7:30 P.M., entering and exiting at the Tensas Street Gate will be via swiping your LSUHSC ID.  Access will also be available through the Florida Avenue drive-in.  All LSUHSC rules and regulations remain in effect regarding proper use and care of our campus properties and facilities.  Please see Chief William Joseph for any other questions.

 

HINARI Training at Tulane Med

On Friday, February 6th the Tulane Health Sciences Center Library and the Center for Continuing Education will offer an all day (8 am to 5 pm) accredited (AMA/CHES/MCHES/CECH/MSW-CE/MLA-CE) training class on Access to Global Health Resources. This training session is partially funded by an award from the National Library of Medicine.

The class will cover using PubMed via HINARI at partner institutions in developing countries. The instructor is Lenny Rhine, PhD, Coordinator of the E-Library Training Initiative, a Librarians Without Borders/Medical Library Association project.

Deadline for registration is Wednesday, February 4th. Cost is $25 for pre-registrants and $50 for day of. For more information, please see the attached flyer.

Library Talk on 1930s New Orleans Medicine

Former journalist Martha Holoubek Fitzgerald, author of The Courtship of Two Doctors: A 1930s Love Story of Letters, Hope & Healing, will discuss ÔÇ£Charity the Beautiful and Hen Medics: An InsiderÔÇÖs Look at 1930s New Orleans MedicineÔÇØ at an upcoming event.

LSU Health Sciences Center Library has the book and other related materials in its archives.

When: Saturday September 28 @ 10am

Where: 219 Loyola Ave, New Orleans Public Library

Brought to you by the LSU Medical Alumni Association and the New Orleans Public Library

 

For more info visit: https://www.lsuhsc.edu/events/docs/FitzgeraldTalk.pdf

 

Your One-Stop Shop for Metro New Orleans Statistics

The New Orleans Index at Eight, released this month, is a publication dedicated to examining trends and progress in the New Orleans metropolitan area since Hurricane Katrina. The updated Index measures economic growth, inclusion, quality of life, and sustainability. The data gathered for New Orleans metro is then compared to a peer group of post-industrial metros determined pre-2000: Nashville, Orlando, Raleigh, and Austin.

Positive economic improvements made at eight years include a recouping of jobs to 1% above its 2008 job level, diversification in knowledge-based industry in the area, and a growth in start-ups. Inclusion improvements show that New Orleans metro did not fall as sharply as the nation in median household income (3% difference), and minority-owned businesses increased to 27 %. New Orleans metro quality of life data shows a strong increase in the number of arts and culture nonprofits at 34 organizations per 100,000 residents, more than double the national rate. And finally, New Orleans metro sustainability has grown in its expansion of bicycle lanes to 56.2 miles.

While these improvements are notable, the New Orleans metro has a long way to go before it can be considered to be in competition with the exponential growth of its peer cities of Nashville, Orlando, Raleigh, and Austin. As the IndexÔÇÖs summary states, ÔÇ£Despite all the shocks it has endure, New Orleans may be on a path toward long-term success. But to fulfill its potential, leaders must look to bolster current strengths and add to them by addressing persistent challenges.ÔÇØ

To view the full report, please visit the Greater New Orleans Community Data Center:?áhttp://www.gnocdc.org/TheNewOrleansIndexAtEight/index.html.

LSUHSC Faculty Are the Best Doctors 2013

Want to know whoÔÇÖs the best? Just pick up a copy of the August issue of New Orleans Magazine for a comprehensive list of the Best Doctors (599 doctors in 76 specialties) in the Greater New Orleans area. Recipients for this recognition were chosen from a nationwide peer survey of more than 45,000 doctors.

LSU Health Sciences Center faculty boasts a whopping 45 positions on the list across a wide range specialties. Their expertise includes the fields of allergy and immunology, anesthesiology, cardiovascular disease, colon and rectal surgery, critical care medicine, family medicine, infectious disease, internal medicine, internal medicine and hospital medicine, neurology, nuclear medicine, ophthalmology, orthopaedic surgery, pathology, pediatric neurology, pediatric specialistÔÇöchild and adolescent psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, psychiatry, pulmonary medicine, rheumatology, surgery, sleep medicine, urology, and vascular surgery.

LSUHSCÔÇÖs very own Dr. Ann H. Tilton stands in the spotlight for her work in pediatric neurology, an ÔÇ£exclusive clubÔÇØ of only 1,200 members in the U. S. and Canada. In recognition of her contributions to the field, Dr. Tilton won the Hower Award from the Child Neurology Society in 2012. Dr. Tilton currently holds positions of Professor of neurology and pediatrics at LSU Health Sciences Center and practicing physician at ChildrenÔÇÖs Hospital. At ChildrenÔÇÖs, she also serves as co-director of the Rehabilitation Center, having established and directed the centerÔÇÖs Comprehensive Spasticity Program.

In general, Dr. TiltonÔÇÖs patients suffer from strokes, clotting problems, trauma, infection, or birth defects. When asked about her toughest cases, Dr. Tilton spoke about the coping of her child-patients versus that of their parents. Whereas children are flexible and resilient, their parents ÔÇ£have to deal with a ÔÇÿnew normal,ÔÇÖ one that differs drastically from the life they were living.ÔÇØ For this reason, teams of therapists (physical, occupational, speech), dieticians, and physicians work together to best care for the patient as a whole.

Congratulations to all who made the list! You can view the Best Doctors online or peruse the LibraryÔÇÖs copy of the magazine in our ÔÇ£Popular ReadingÔÇØ section.

Volunteers needed for a Mission of Mercy

The American Dental Association will be meeting in New Orleans October 31 – November 2, 2013. ?áIn conjunction with this meeting, they will be sponsoring Big Easy Smiles, a Mission of Mercy (MOM) providing free dental care on Sunday, November 3rd for the poor and underserved of New Orleans. ?áDuring the event, organizers hope to provide dental care to 1,000 people.

This first Mission of Mercy in Louisiana is a chance to give back to our beloved city and to show the community that we are willing and able to share our gifts with the poor. ?áNOLA Mission of Mercy organizers need 800 volunteers to get this done. ?áYou don’t have to be a dental health professional or student to help! ?áOrganizers are looking for dentists, hygienists, dental assistants, computer – IT, dental equipment technicians, patient ambassadors, food servers, clean-up crew and many other positions. ?áAnyone 18yrs or older can help!

If you, or someone you know, would like to help out, please go to the ADA Mission of Mercy site: ?áhttp://www.ada.org/session/8462.aspx

Please consider volunteering some of your time for this great cause!

 

Free NOLA CARE Clinic with Volunteer Opportunities

On Wednesday, July 3rd from 8 am to 9 pm, the National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics (NAFC)?áwill host a one day free medical clinic?áat the Morial Convention Center. The clinic is still seeking medical (and non-medical) volunteers, including physicians, nurses, and students in those fields.

3rd Year Medical Student in the News

Third year medical student, Jarrett Pytell, was featured in a WWL-TV news story about the Mother’s Day Second Line Shooting. He used his trauma training to assist victims until EMS arrived. Thanks to the LSU Health Sciences twitter feed for the alert.

Parking for Jazz Fest

In case you missed it, here’s an email message from the Chancellor on parking for Jazz Fest at the Dental School:

“The New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival will be held at the New Orleans Fairgrounds this weekend (April 26-28) and next week (May 2-5).?á Dean Henry Gremillion, DDS, has kindly extended an invitation to LSUHSC New Orleans faculty, staff and students planning to attend to park at the Dental School, space permitting, with their LSUHSC IDÔÇÖs and gate cards.?á University Police will accommodate entering and exiting through the Tensas Street Gate (the back Walk Thru Gate) on the above-referenced dates until 7:30 PM each night.?á After 7:30 PM, entering and exiting will be allowed only through the Florida Avenue drive-in.?á All LSUHSC rules and regulations remain in effect regarding proper use and care of our campus properties and facilities.?á Please see Chief William Joseph for any other questions.”

Free Dental Work

The LSU School of Dentistry is currently screening for patients willing to participate in clinical board exams for graduating seniors.?á The dental screenings are free and IF CHOSEN to be a patient for the board exams there will be $50 in compensation. They are looking for people with good overall oral hygiene who may need a small cavity filled or just a general cleaning. In short, if you have a common type of dental needs, nothing fancy or overly involved, feel free to attend one of the screening sessions

For more information, please consult the flyer.

Cool Find: 1937 footage of “old Charity” torn down

Our colleagues at the Matas Library of the Health Sciences, Tulane Univerity uploaded 6 minutes of footage from 1937, filmed by Richard G. Holcombe when he was an intern, of the fifth Charity Hospital’s demolition. It was constructed in 1833 and was in use for over 100 years until the construction of “Big Charity.”

The footage was conserved in 2004 and does not include audio.

NOPL Hosts U.S. Poet Laureate

This Thursday, December 6th, U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey will grace us with a reading and book signing at the Main Branch of the New Orleans Public Library.

A Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and native of Mississippi, Trethewey is known for her portrayal of the Gulf South through powerful, natural imagery and historical narrative.?áThe?áLibrarian of Congress James Billington ?álauds, “Her poems dig beneath the surface of historyÔÇöpersonal or communal, from childhood or from a century agoÔÇöto explore the human struggles that we all face.” ?áYou can read examples of?áTrethewey’s work at poets.org.

The?áreading?á will begin at 7pm and is free and open to the public. We hope to see you there!

 

 

Physician Assistant Degree Program Arrives at LSUHSC

This January, the LSU Health Sciences Center jumps on the health education bandwagon as it inaugurates a brand-new ARC-PA accredited physician assistant training program. LSUHSCÔÇÖs 29-month program of study in evidence-based medicine will instruct its students in patient examination, diagnosis, and treatment.

Dr. Charles L. Hudson first proposed the creation of a physicianÔÇÖs assistant position at a 1961 meeting of the American Medical Association (AMA) as a way to mitigate the decline in primary care providers. Ranked second in CNN Money MagazineÔÇÖs ÔÇ£Best Jobs in America 2010,ÔÇØ this careerÔÇÖs ÔÇ£average annual pay was $86,410 in 2010 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Federal labor officials projected a 30 percent growth rate in the occupation between 2010 and 2020.ÔÇØ

The John P. Isch?® Library would like to take this opportunity to welcome LSUHSCÔÇÖs 30 new students to the School of Allied Health Professionals! We look forward to introducing you to all our Library has to offer.

Greater New Orleans Census Data Results

The Greater New Orleans Community Data Center (GNOCDC) recently released an examination of U.S. census data: ÔÇ£Who Lives in New Orleans and the Metro Area Now?ÔÇØ. In this report, the GNOCDC compares New Orleans census data from 2000 to data from 2011 in juxtaposition with national averages. Results are graphed according to changes in race/ethnicity, changes in educational attainment and income, changes in poverty and access to vehicles, changes in foreign-born population, and changes in homeownership and household types. The brief focuses on Orleans Parish, Jefferson Parish, St. Tammany Parish, and the Metro area, each of which are the most populous areas with the most readily available data.

According the census data, several shifts took place in New Orleans demographics with more pronounced changes occurring in the growth of the Hispanic community, the growth of single-person households, and corresponding decreases in adults with less than a high school degree and increase in adults with a bachelorÔÇÖs degree or higher. In comparison with national averages, however, the Hispanic population here is still low, the median household income in Orleans is only $35,041 versus the national $50,502 (though St. TammanyÔÇÖs is $56,536). New Orleans poverty rate is up to 13% higher in Orleans Parish than the U.S., amount of children in poverty almost 20% higher in Orleans than the U.S, households without access to a vehicle 10% higher, and homeownership rates 20% lower in Orleans, but 12% higher than the U.S in St. Tammany.

You can check out the results for yourself here.