book club

November’s Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club Pick: The Deepest Well

UPDATE: The Deepest Well is now available to borrow from the LSUHSC Library. (One electronic copy available at a time.)

“Childhood adversity is a story we think we know. Children have faced trauma and stress in the form of abuse, neglect, violence, and fear since God was a boy. Parents have been getting trashed, getting arrested, and getting divorced for almost as long. The people who are smart and strong enough are able to rise above the past and triumph through the force of their own will and resilience. Or are they?” – Nadine Burke Harris, The Deepest Well: Healing The Long-Term Effects Of Childhood Adversity

This month the Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club, hosted by the School of Public Health’s Diversity and Inclusivity Committee, will discuss The Deepest Well: Healing The Long-Term Effects Of Childhood Adversity by Nadine Burke Harris as its November read.

The Book Club will discuss The Deepest Well on Zoom on Wednesday, November 18th at 12pm.

For more about the Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club, including information on next month’s Book Club pick and meeting time, email sphdiversity@lsuhsc.edu.

October’s Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club Pick: Pushout

“The struggle is real. Yet when girls strike back against this fatigue, society casts them as deviant—as disruptive to the order of a (supposedly race- and gender-neutral) social structure without consideration of what might be fueling their agitation.” – Monique W. Morris, Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

This month the Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club, hosted by the School of Public Health’s Diversity and Inclusivity Committee, will discuss Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools by Monique W. Morris as its October read.

As described by its publisher, Pushout “chronicles the experiences of Black girls across the country” and exposes the ways in which the education system in the US fails these young girls “whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish.”

The Book Club will discuss Pushout on Zoom on Wednesday, October 14th at 12pm. If you’d like to read and take part in the event, the Library provides access to an eBook version through EBSCO, with unlimited users at a time.

For more about the Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club, including information on next month’s Book Club pick and meeting time, visit the Committee’s page on the School of Public Health Website or email sphdiversity@lsuhsc.edu.

September’s Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club Pick: Diversity Visibility

“I am living in a time where disabled people are more visible than ever before. And yet while representation is exciting and important, it is not enough. I want and expect more. We all should expect more. We all deserve more.” – Alice Wong, Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century

This month the Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club, hosted by the School of Public Health’s Diversity and Inclusivity Committee, discussed Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century edited by Alice Wong as its September read.

Disability Visibility  is a collection of essays by disabled people, written in part for the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Disability Visibility provides readers a chance to hear a wide-range of first-hand stories about living with disabilities in the modern era.

Although the discussion may have ended, your access to Diversity Visibility hasn’t. The library provides access to an eBook version through EBSCO, with a limit to one user at a time.

For more about the Diversity and Inclusivity Book Club, including information on next month’s Book Club pick and meeting time, visit the Committee’s page on the School of Public Health Website or email sphdiversity@lsuhsc.edu.

2020-2021 List for Diversity & Inclusivity Book Club

In support of the Diversity & Inclusivity Book Club, the Library has electronic copies of all 2020-2021 reading list materials:

August 2020 – Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates

September 2020 – Disability Visibility: first-person stories from the Twenty-first century, edited by Alice Wong

October 2020 – Pushout: the criminalization of Black girls in schools, by Monique W. Morris

November 2020 – The New Trail of Tears: how Washington is destroying American Indians, by Naomi Schaefer Riley

December 2020 – Our Women on the Ground: essays by Arab women reporting from the Arab world, edited by Zahra Hankir

January 2021 – Food in Cuba: the pursuit of a decent meal, by Hanna Garth

February 2021 – Data Feminism, by Catherine D’Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein

March 2021 – Solito, Solita: crossing borders with youth refugees from Central America, edited by Steven Mayers and Jonathan Freedman

April 2021 – Medical Apartheid: the dark history of medical experimentation on Black Americans from colonial times to the present, by Harriet A. Washington

May 2021 – The Stonewall Reader, from the New York Public Library

 

The first meeting is August 19th, 2020 at 12PM via Zoom: https://lsuhsc.zoom.us/j/95020137085
Meeting ID: 950 2013 7085


For more information, please email Hasheemah Afaneh at hafane@lsuhsc.edu.

Campus Wide Book Club Meeting

Book Club Digital Sign

The Campuswide Book Club will meet on Monday, November 12th to discuss it’s latest title, Nine Lives. The author and some of the New Orleanians featured in the book will be in attendance.

Location: Medical Education Building, 1901 Perdido, Seminar rm. 4

Time: 12:15 – 1:30 pm Monday, November 12th

The LSUHSC Campuswide Book Club is sponsored by the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Multicultural Affairs.

Paying Patients for Their Tissue: The Legacy of Henrietta Lacks

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Available for checkout in the library

Do patients have rights to revenue streams should their tissue hold value for biomedical research? Science Journal’s Policy Forum discusses the ethics of tissue research as examined in Rebecca Skloot’s book?áthe Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, which was LSUHSC’s first book club selection ealier this year. Physician-investigators weigh in on property rights in human tissue and investigators’ obligations to individuals from whom they seek tissue for research.

Full citation: Science 6 July 2012:
Vol. 337 no. 6090 pp. 37-38
DOI: 10.1126/science.1216888?á(barcode & PIN?árequired?áoff campus)
POLICY FORUM -?áRESEARCH ETHICS
Paying Patients for Their Tissue: The Legacy of Henrietta Lacks
Robert D. Truog -?áChildren’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA 02115, USA,?áAaron S. Kesselheim?áBrigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02120, USA, Steven Joffe -?áDana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Campuswide Book Club Discussion

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Now available in the library

The Book Club will gather on Monday, May 7th from 12:15pm to 1:45pm in MEB Lecture Room 4 for a ÔÇ£brown bagÔÇØ discussion of the book and its relevance for the work we all do. A distinguished panel featuring Drs. Corey Hebert, Cassandra Youmans, and John Estrada will lead this important discussion.

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor, black tobacco farmer whose cellsÔÇötaken without her knowledge in 1951ÔÇöbecame one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. HenriettaÔÇÖs cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family canÔÇÖt afford health insurance.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (Broadway Paperbacks 2011), by Rebecca Skloot, is an enjoyable read that delves into issues of health care disparities and medical ethics. An award winning piece of non-fiction, this book was featured on over 60 criticsÔÇÖ best of the year lists and was awarded the 2010 Wellcome Trust Book Prize, the American Association for the Advancement of ScienceÔÇÖs Award for Excellence in Science Writing, the 2011 Audie Award for Best Nonfiction Audiobook, and a Medical JournalistsÔÇÖ Association Open Book Award.

 

Introducing the LSUHSC Campuswide Book Club

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Now available in the library

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor, black tobacco farmer whose cellsÔÇötaken without her knowledge in 1951ÔÇöbecame one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. HenriettaÔÇÖs cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family canÔÇÖt afford health insurance.

The Isché Library is proud to announce that the inaugural LSUHSC?áCampuswide Book Club selection is now?áavailable in the Reserve Collection.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks(Broadway Paperbacks 2011), by Rebecca Skloot,?áis an enjoyable read that delves into issues of health care disparities and medical ethics. An award winning piece of non-fiction, this book was featured on over 60 criticsÔÇÖ best of the year lists and was awarded the 2010 Wellcome Trust Book Prize, the American Association for the Advancement of ScienceÔÇÖs Award for Excellence in Science Writing, the 2011 Audie Award for Best Nonfiction Audiobook, and a Medical JournalistsÔÇÖ Association Open Book Award.

The Book Club will gather on Monday, May 7th from 12:15pm to 1:45pm in MEB Lecture Room 4 for a ÔÇ£brown bagÔÇØ discussion of the book and its relevance for the work we all do.?á A distinguished panel featuring ?áDrs. Corey Hebert, Cassandra Youmans, and John Estrada will?álead this important discussion.

For more information contact drovar@lsuhsc.edu