CDC – Bring Your Brave




We’re almost half way through breast cancer awareness month. Bring Your Brave is a new campaign focusing on young women with breast cancer. While breast cancer usually effects women over the age of 45, it does occur in about 11% of younger women. Breast cancer can be hereditary however that’s not always the case. There are ways you can reduce your risk of getting breast cancer such as limiting your alcohol intake, maintaining a healthy weight and breastfeeding.

Breast cancer symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • Lump in the breast or underarm/armpit area
  • Thickening or swelling of part of the breast.
  • Redness or flaky skin in the nipple area or the breast.
  • Nipple discharge other than breast milk, including blood.

It is important to get screened if you notice any symptoms early on, in order to start fighting back sooner than later.

For more information, visit:



Happy Veterans Day

The Libraries are open regular hours today, but would like to take a moment and thank all of our veterans as well as those currently serving.

If you haven’t seen it elsewhere, meet the oldest known living veteran, 107 year old Richard Overton of Texas who will be honored at the White House today. I don’t know that his recommendations of whiskey in your coffee and cigars would really work for all of us.

It’s AcWriMo 2013!

Inspired by the hugely successful NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), PhD2Published, a blog dedicated to helping academics publish, has announced that November is also AcWriMo (Academic Writing Month).

AcWriMo is a month long academic write-a-thon for academics at all stages of their careers. ?áPhD2Published will support writers with dedicated posts about academic writing and thousands of Tweets to encourage you to keep going throughout the month.





According to their website:

“There are 6 basic rules:

1. Decide on your goal. You might count words, hours put in or projects achieved ÔÇô itÔÇÖs up to you. But try and push yourself a bit. (And if you need help counting our?áPhDometer app?áÔÇô the proceeds from which help fund this month-long writing extravaganza ÔÇô was designed for just that!)

2. Declare it! Basically, just sign up on the?áAcWriMo 2013 Writing Accountability Spreadsheet?áand fill in the sections on what youÔÇÖd like to achieve by the end of the month. Being accountable is key to this working for you. You need to feel a bit of pressure to get the work done. So sign up and add your goals as soon as you can.

3. Draft a strategy. DonÔÇÖt start AcWriMo without doing a bit of planning and preparation. Get some reading done, carve out time slots in your schedule to dedicate to writing, even buy your favorite coffee. Sort out whatever youÔÇÖll need to write, and get it done now, there wonÔÇÖt be time when November comes around.

4. Discuss your progress. OK so being on Twitter and Facebook with us all day isn’t acceptable ÔÇô you’ve got work to do ÔÇô but checking-in at certain times is really important! We want to know how youÔÇÖre getting on? What is working for you and what isn’t? Do you need help? Do you want to share a writing triumph? (YouÔÇÖll find most discussion about AcWriMo on Twitter using the?á#AcWriMo?áhashtag, but if?áFacebook?áis more your thing, go there. Or use your own blog to keep in touch. You can even write little updates you want to share in the?áspreadsheet.)

5. DonÔÇÖt slack off. As participant Bettina said of the first AcWriMo, you must ÔÇÿwrite like thereÔÇÖs no December!ÔÇÖ If you push yourself, youÔÇÖll quickly discover the tips and techniques that work best for YOU and thatÔÇÖll save you even more time in the long-run.

6. Declare your results. ItÔÇÖs great to use the spreadsheet everyday (or as often as you can) to chart how youÔÇÖre getting on, but even if you canÔÇÖt do that, you MUST announce your results at the end of the month. Our writing community benefits not only from sharing in your achievements, but knowing what didn’t work and being reminded that, at the end of the day, weÔÇÖre all human!”

So everyone should go forth and WRITE… That’s what I’ll be doing this month!

CDC Celebrates Mothers

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a feature this week in anticipation of Mother’s Day and National Women’s Health Week.?á This feature, Ways to Help Make Mother’s Day Healthy, offers advice on how Moms can keep themselves healthy for their families.

They also created a feature, Celebrate Moms who Protect Children’s Health, so Mom’s who don’t smoke deserve extra love!

This Month in History: Enjoy Rabbits Playing Piano

A brief interlude for your busy day: Harvey the virtuoso rabbit and her YouTube accompaniment, Elissa watch?v=0NzN8ksnJhA.

As you might have guessed, rabbits are not particularly adept at playing the piano (certainly not as well-attuned as a famous piano-playing cat, Nora: most-outrageous-piano-playing-cat.htm). In an attempt to challenge unfair bunny stereotypes, Dr. Waid H. Dean, Instructor of Physiology at LSU Medical School, chose Harvey to prove the musical worth of her species.

Though Dr. Dean openly admits “there is no scientific purpose to this demonstration”?á in a 1958 Times-Picayune article, he says the rabbit’s performance “is merely to demonstrate that animals can be trained to respond to signals.” As with many high-achieving parents, Dr. Dean is not easy to please and expects the best from his tiny Leporidaean maestro. Harvey cannot live up to expectations, however–quickly tiring out after a couple of notes and anxious for her next treat. Though she may not be 6 feet 3 inches tall like another famous Harvey, she is decidedly more cuddly.

On that note, Happy Spring from the staff at John P. Ische Library!



PIG (Pediatric Interest Group) is sponsoring a toy drive.?á Drop off boxes are in Lecture Halls A & B on the 1st floor of the MEB. Last day to donate is Tuesday December 18th, so hurry!

November is American Diabetes Month

So now that turkey day is over and done with, answer these questions:

  • Are you overweight?
  • Exercise less than 3x per week?
  • Have high blood pressure or high cholesterol?
  • Have any immediate relatives with diabetes?

Today there are millions at risk for developing type-2 diabetes. Many people donÔÇÖt understand the severity of the disease which often leads to stroke, heart disease and even blindness.

You can do a lot to improve your chances of NOT getting type-2 diabetes such as monitoring blood pressure and cholesterol levels, exercising and being more active, eating healthy, etc.

For more info, please visit:





Happy Halloween from the CDC

Just what everyone wants today,?átips and?áHealth-e-Cards from the CDC. I am particular fond of the flossing vampire. Cards are available in English & Spanish.

Screen capture from Health-e-Card

Happy National Taco Day!

If youÔÇÖre in the mood to celebrate a wonderful fake holiday, check out this abc news bit wherein the newscasters wear sombreros and taunt the audience with deliciously unhealthy food and free taco promises.

And if (like me) youÔÇÖre really into the autumn momentum, check out these online recipes for pumpkin tacos: http://www.wearenotmartha.com/2010/09/pumpkin-chicken-tacos/ or http://mommymishmash.com/2010/01/pumpkin-tacos-not-a-typo/.

Happy National Talk Like a Pirate Day!

Avast me hearties! In celebration of this wondrous event, hereÔÇÖs an amusing cartoon for your mid-afternoon enjoyment.

If youÔÇÖre interested in learning more about pirate surgeons, try searching for information on the ÔÇ£Father of Sea Surgery,ÔÇØ John Woodall, who authored The SurgeonÔÇÖs Mate. The British Journal of Surgery has a neat article on this very subject.

And for the sake of our other patrons, please try to keep your swashbuckling to a minimum in the Library.

Books Featured for Occupational Therapy Month

The Isch?®?áLibrary and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) are?ácelebrating April as Occupational Therapy Month. The Library has a group of important books on the subject of OT currently displayed on the third floor next to the Library elevator.

These titles include:

  1. Cole, MB. Group dynamics in occupational therapy: the theoretical basis and practice application of group intervention (2005; 2012 edition is also available on Reserve).
  2. Stein, F, & Cutler, SK. Psychosocial occupational therapy: a holistic approach (2002).
  3. Hemphill-Pearson, BJ. Assessments in occupational therapy mental health: an integrative approach (2008).
  4. Willard, HS, & edited by EB Crepeau, ES Cohn, BA Boyt Schell; 104 contributors. Willard & Spackman’s occupational therapy (2003; 2012 edition is also available on Reserve).
  5. Christiansen, CH, CM Baum, & J Bass-Haugen. Occupational therapy: performance, participation, and well-being (2005; 2009 edition is also available on Reserve).
  6. Law, M, C Baum, & W Dunn. Measuring occupational performance: supporting best practice in occupational therapy (2005).
  7. Letts, L, P Rigby, & D Stewart. Using environments to enable occupational performance (2003).
  8. Law, L, & MA McColl. Interventions, effects, and outcomes in occupational therapy: adults and older adults (2010).
  9. Moyers, PA, & LM Dale. The guide to occupational therapy practice (2007).
  10. Wilcock, AA. An occupational perspective of health (2006).
  11. McCormack, GL, EG Jaffe, & M Goodman-Lavey. The occupational therapy manager (2003).
  12. Jacobs, K. Ergonomics for therapists (2007).
  13. Fazio, LS. Developing occupation-centered programs for the community (2008).
  14. Kielhofner, G. A model of human occupation: theory and application (2002).
  15. Radomski, MV, & CA Trombly Latham. Occupational therapy for physical dysfunction (2008).

Don’t forget to also investigate the Library’s occupational therapy eBooks: an assortment is available through online resources such as the R2 Digital Library, Stat!Ref, and Books@Ovid.

More info about Occupational Therapy Month and the OT profession is available on the Association’s website at www.aota.org.

LSUHSC Students – OT Awareness Video

edit: as of today, Weds. April 11, the video has been removed. Sorry!

The Occupational Therapy students have created a video and posted it on YouTube to get the attention of Ellen Degeneres and promote OT Awareness. April is OT Awareness Month.

Louisiana Named – 330 years ago

A color reproduction of a 17th Century map by Jean Baptiste Louis, Franquelin entitled Carte de la Louisiane ou des voyages du Sr. De La Salle.

On April 9, 1682, explorer Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle made it to the mouth of the Mississippi River, named the territory Louisiana and claimed it in the name of France.

Happy Name Day to the entire former Louisiana Territory.

March 25th eCycling Event at Superdome

Tomorrow New Orleanians are encouraged to drop off electronics for a recycling event brought to you by LG Electronics USA. In exchange each participant will receive a $50-$150 Best Buy instant savings coupon, that can ONLY be used in the purchase of a qualifiable ENERGY STAR LG flat-panel tv and can ONLY be redeemed between the dates of March 25th and April 7th.?á The ÔÇ£Do March RightÔÇØ themed event is so convenient that participants donÔÇÖt even have to get out of their cars to donate. Recycling reduces the amount of hazardous waste in landfills as well as cut back on ?áthe extracting of raw materials from the earth.


Acceptable Items include (but are not limited to):

?áComputers ÔÇô CPUs

Computer monitors


Fax machines




Home and Cell Phones

GPS devices

Digital Cameras

For a full list of acceptable items and items that are not accepted, please see the following links:





International Women’s Day

Search Google today? This particular Google Doodle recognizes International Women’s Day, an annual event on March 8th. It is a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future.?áThe?áfirst International Women’s Day event was run in 1911. In some places like China, Russia, Vietnam and Bulgaria, International Women’s Day is a national holiday.

So beyond the fact that women make up over 50% of the world’s population and 90% of the Library Staff, why should we care? Susan Blumenthal, M.D., Public Health Editor at HuffPost and Former U.S. Assistant Surgeon General, has an excellent essay today reflecting upon the changes she has seen in women’s health. ?áWomen’s Health: Decades Later, What’s Still Neglected.

For example, did you know:

  • A Congressional Report in 1990 revealed that only 13 percent of the National Institutes of Health budget was spent on women’s health research
  • Until fairly recently in our nation’s history (1993), women were largely excluded from being subjects in medical research and data was not analyzed for sex and gender differences
  • Women represent only 12 percent of the Deans of U.S. medical schools, fewer than 27 percent of tenured professors and 13 percent of the over 2070 Departmental Chairs in our nation’s medical schools

The good news is, things are changing. The?áNational Women’s Health?áInformation Center (NWHIC) ?áis available ?áthrough a toll free telephone number (800-944-WOMAN) and ?áat?áwww.womenshealth.gov. It?áprovides consumers, health professionals, and researchers with free information and suport for ?áa broad range of women’s health issues. Changing the Face of Medicine?á is an online exhibit from the NIH which explores?áthe many ways that women have influenced and enhanced the practice of medicine. ?áSo the next time someone asks “Where are the girls?” you can show them.