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Allied Health

7th Annual Health and Wellness Event 11/6

Today,?áWednesday November 6th,?áis officially the 7th Annual Health and Wellness Event!?á

From: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Location: 3rd floor of the Medical Education Building (across from the cafeteria)

 

 

It’s AcWriMo 2013!

Inspired by the hugely successful NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), PhD2Published, a blog dedicated to helping academics publish, has announced that November is also AcWriMo (Academic Writing Month).

AcWriMo is a month long academic write-a-thon for academics at all stages of their careers. ?áPhD2Published will support writers with dedicated posts about academic writing and thousands of Tweets to encourage you to keep going throughout the month.

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According to their website:

“There are 6 basic rules:

1. Decide on your goal. You might count words, hours put in or projects achieved ÔÇô itÔÇÖs up to you. But try and push yourself a bit. (And if you need help counting our?áPhDometer app?áÔÇô the proceeds from which help fund this month-long writing extravaganza ÔÇô was designed for just that!)

2. Declare it! Basically, just sign up on the?áAcWriMo 2013 Writing Accountability Spreadsheet?áand fill in the sections on what youÔÇÖd like to achieve by the end of the month. Being accountable is key to this working for you. You need to feel a bit of pressure to get the work done. So sign up and add your goals as soon as you can.

3. Draft a strategy. DonÔÇÖt start AcWriMo without doing a bit of planning and preparation. Get some reading done, carve out time slots in your schedule to dedicate to writing, even buy your favorite coffee. Sort out whatever youÔÇÖll need to write, and get it done now, there wonÔÇÖt be time when November comes around.

4. Discuss your progress. OK so being on Twitter and Facebook with us all day isn’t acceptable ÔÇô you’ve got work to do ÔÇô but checking-in at certain times is really important! We want to know how youÔÇÖre getting on? What is working for you and what isn’t? Do you need help? Do you want to share a writing triumph? (YouÔÇÖll find most discussion about AcWriMo on Twitter using the?á#AcWriMo?áhashtag, but if?áFacebook?áis more your thing, go there. Or use your own blog to keep in touch. You can even write little updates you want to share in the?áspreadsheet.)

5. DonÔÇÖt slack off. As participant Bettina said of the first AcWriMo, you must ÔÇÿwrite like thereÔÇÖs no December!ÔÇÖ If you push yourself, youÔÇÖll quickly discover the tips and techniques that work best for YOU and thatÔÇÖll save you even more time in the long-run.

6. Declare your results. ItÔÇÖs great to use the spreadsheet everyday (or as often as you can) to chart how youÔÇÖre getting on, but even if you canÔÇÖt do that, you MUST announce your results at the end of the month. Our writing community benefits not only from sharing in your achievements, but knowing what didn’t work and being reminded that, at the end of the day, weÔÇÖre all human!”

So everyone should go forth and WRITE… That’s what I’ll be doing this month!

Hearing through your teeth?

Recently, a new type of hearing aid was approved for use in Europe. ?áThis new device attaches to a patient’s teeth and conducts sound through the teeth and facial bones.

While this device doesn’t look terribly comfortable for the patient, researchers believe it could open doors to new types of hearing aids. ?áIf you would like more information about the development of this new device, check out these articles.

This new product is a prime example of what interprofessional collaboration in the health sciences can do!

 

 

More Nursing and Allied Health Journals Available via CINAHL Complete!

 

The Library is pleased to announce that we now have CINAHL Complete! CINAHL Complete is EBSCOÔÇÖs most comprehensive access point for full-text nursing and allied health literature. It replaces CINAHL Plus with Full Text, but donÔÇÖt worry, you wonÔÇÖt have to learn how to use a new product; the look and functionality are the same. What is different is that now there are more?áfull-text journals?áand indexed titles.?á “How many?ámore?” you ask!?á Well,?áthere are over 550?ámore?áfull-text journals and over 150 additional indexed journals.?á In all, CINAHL Complete includes access to over 1,300 full-text journals and includes indexing for over 5,400 journals. Our subscription also includes over 130 Evidence-Based Care Sheets, 170 Continuing Education Modules, and more. To see a complete list of journals available, you can click on ÔÇ£PublicationsÔÇØ at the top of the CINAHL Complete screen.

 

LSUHSC-NO faculty, staff, and students can access CINAHL Complete on or off campus. Visit our CINAHL Complete electronic resource page for more information: http://www.lsuhsc.edu/no/library/ss&d/data/cinahl.html.?á?á

Remember, many of the core journals are listed in the library catalog, INNOPAC, and you can link directly to a journal?áand browse available issues from there, too.?á And all these journals are listed in our EBSCO A to Z list.

For further assistance searching CINAHL Complete, contact a reference librarian on duty.

Problem installing Write-n-Cite?

Some users new to RefWorks came across this message when attempting to install Write-n-Cite on their school laptops:

ÔÇ£Microsoft visual studio 2010 Tools for Office Runtime (x86) needs to be installed for this installation to continue.ÔÇØ

Write-n-Cite requires the users to have Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 installed on their computers.?á It is a free download available from the Microsoft website: ?áhttp://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=35594

Once that program is installed, you may proceed with the?áinstillation?áprocess.

 

If you would like more information about RefWorks and Write-n-Cite please email the reference librarians, reference@lsuhsc.edu. ?áKeep an eye out for upcoming Introduction to RefWorks classes.

 

 

Popular health topics of 2012

Last week, MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine and National Institute of Health’s consumer health database, published the top 10 most?ávisited health topic searches?áof 2012:

Looking at these searches, it would seem that the public are?ásearching for information on?áthe most common health?áthreats in the?áUnited States.?á?áAccording to the Mayo Clinic, the top seven threats to women’s health are?áheart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, accidents, and type 2 diabetes. The top seven threats to men’s health are similar:?áheart disease, cancer, accidents, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and suicide.

Of course the most visited sites could also mean that people who were diagnosed with high blood pressure and diabetes started exercising?ábut they had trouble breathing, had heart palpitations,?ágot sunburned, and hurt their backs!

Physician Assistant Degree Program Arrives at LSUHSC

This January, the LSU Health Sciences Center jumps on the health education bandwagon as it inaugurates a brand-new ARC-PA accredited physician assistant training program. LSUHSCÔÇÖs 29-month program of study in evidence-based medicine will instruct its students in patient examination, diagnosis, and treatment.

Dr. Charles L. Hudson first proposed the creation of a physicianÔÇÖs assistant position at a 1961 meeting of the American Medical Association (AMA) as a way to mitigate the decline in primary care providers. Ranked second in CNN Money MagazineÔÇÖs ÔÇ£Best Jobs in America 2010,ÔÇØ this careerÔÇÖs ÔÇ£average annual pay was $86,410 in 2010 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Federal labor officials projected a 30 percent growth rate in the occupation between 2010 and 2020.ÔÇØ

The John P. Isch?® Library would like to take this opportunity to welcome LSUHSCÔÇÖs 30 new students to the School of Allied Health Professionals! We look forward to introducing you to all our Library has to offer.

Health & Wellness Event – Wednesday Nov 7th

What:?á 6th Annual Health & Wellness Event

When:?á Wednesday November 7th from 10 am ÔÇô 2 pm

Where:?á MEB 3rd floor Room S4

Stop by and get a chance to win a lot of prizes including signed Saints photographs, gift cards, and many?á more!?á The first 200 people to come and fill out the exit survey will get a Mardi Gras cup printed with the eventÔÇÖs logo!?á The Wellness Center will also be offering 30 min sessions of some of their group exercise classes in Room S10:

11:00 ÔÇô 11:30 am:?á Zumba

12:00 ÔÇô 12:30 pm:?á Pilates and Yoga Challenge

1:00 ÔÇô 1:30 pm:?á Kickboxing

Brought to you by:?á Physical Therapy Students Class of 2014

Friday fun: games edition

Our ?áintrepid physical therapy students c/o 2014 are holding a health fair next month, and want to know what attendees (which would be all employees, faculty, and students of LSUHealth New Orleans) would like to learn from the event. Check out their quick survey and let them know what you want! The health fair is set for Wednesday Nov. 7th from?á10:00 AM-2:00 PM by the cafeteria, and rumor is they may have some cool Saints-related prizes for participants.

Now that the hard work is over, here’s some fun and games from Healthelinks for Kids, a project out of?áLSUHealth Shreveport.

 

Milk Matters for Kids:?áHelp Bo Vine the cow escape from the farm and make it to the great Calcium fair.

Big E’s Grossest Hits: He’s a rotten roll star, playing his germy music.

The Great Bully Roundup: ?áTest your bully smarts in this?á?áinteractive board game for one or two players. Be careful or you’ll land in Bully Corral.

Friday Fun: Communication edition

Meet Julie & Simon. Or Misaki and Kyoko. Or Annike and Sven.

These free text-to-speech avatars turn text into speech with options to modulate speed, pitch, dialects, and more. This useful tool for speech therapists is engaging for the non clinicians as well – if only for the fact their eyes follow the mouse around the screen.

Text-to-speech: http://www.oddcast.com/home/demos/tts/tts_example.php?sitepal

Found via the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association – Research Databases and Other Online Tools.

Kinesio Tape at the Olympics

If you’ve been watching the Olympics, you’ve noticed the tape on various athletes. Mostly it seems to be a relatively new product, Kinesio Tape.?á NPR News wrote a story on its efficacy earlier this week. The news article linked to a 2012?ástudy in Sports Medicine and?á a 2008 article in Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy; both are?áavailable to LSUHSC Library patrons.

Full text?áaccess to the articles may only be available to LSUHSC faculty, staff & students. It can be accessed off-campus with a valid LSUHSC library barcode & PIN. You can find more information at our remote access webpage.

New Adverse Effects Checker

Are you or your patients having strange symptoms after taking an new herbal supplement??á Natural Standard can help!

Natural Standard, a source for?á high-quality, evidence-based information about complementary and alternative medicine, announced today the release of their new Adverse Effects Checker.

Simply check off the symptoms and the Adverse Effects Checker will provide a list of dietary supplements that may be causing those symptoms.

Books Featured for Occupational Therapy Month

The Isch?®?áLibrary and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) are?ácelebrating April as Occupational Therapy Month. The Library has a group of important books on the subject of OT currently displayed on the third floor next to the Library elevator.

These titles include:

  1. Cole, MB. Group dynamics in occupational therapy: the theoretical basis and practice application of group intervention (2005; 2012 edition is also available on Reserve).
  2. Stein, F, & Cutler, SK. Psychosocial occupational therapy: a holistic approach (2002).
  3. Hemphill-Pearson, BJ. Assessments in occupational therapy mental health: an integrative approach (2008).
  4. Willard, HS, & edited by EB Crepeau, ES Cohn, BA Boyt Schell; 104 contributors. Willard & Spackman’s occupational therapy (2003; 2012 edition is also available on Reserve).
  5. Christiansen, CH, CM Baum, & J Bass-Haugen. Occupational therapy: performance, participation, and well-being (2005; 2009 edition is also available on Reserve).
  6. Law, M, C Baum, & W Dunn. Measuring occupational performance: supporting best practice in occupational therapy (2005).
  7. Letts, L, P Rigby, & D Stewart. Using environments to enable occupational performance (2003).
  8. Law, L, & MA McColl. Interventions, effects, and outcomes in occupational therapy: adults and older adults (2010).
  9. Moyers, PA, & LM Dale. The guide to occupational therapy practice (2007).
  10. Wilcock, AA. An occupational perspective of health (2006).
  11. McCormack, GL, EG Jaffe, & M Goodman-Lavey. The occupational therapy manager (2003).
  12. Jacobs, K. Ergonomics for therapists (2007).
  13. Fazio, LS. Developing occupation-centered programs for the community (2008).
  14. Kielhofner, G. A model of human occupation: theory and application (2002).
  15. Radomski, MV, & CA Trombly Latham. Occupational therapy for physical dysfunction (2008).

Don’t forget to also investigate the Library’s occupational therapy eBooks: an assortment is available through online resources such as the R2 Digital Library, Stat!Ref, and Books@Ovid.

More info about Occupational Therapy Month and the OT profession is available on the Association’s website at www.aota.org.

LSUHSC Students – OT Awareness Video

edit: as of today, Weds. April 11, the video has been removed. Sorry!

The Occupational Therapy students have created a video and posted it on YouTube to get the attention of Ellen Degeneres and promote OT Awareness. April is OT Awareness Month.
Enjoy!

Celebrating the life of Susan Daniels

LSUHSC lost a piece of history earlier this year with the passing of Susan Daniels, the amazing woman who founded the Department of Rehabilitation Counseling in 1978.

Rehabilitation counseling honors Dr. Daniels in May 2010
Susan M. Daniels, Ph.D. died October 20 in Washington, DC. She was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, October 24, 1948, the daughter of the late Marie Ducote Daniels and Harry James Daniels, Sr.

Dr. Daniels was a graduate of St. MaryÔÇÖs Dominican High School, New Orleans (alumna of the year 2001), and Marquette University (summa cum laude). She received her Master’s Degree in Psychology from Mississippi State University (alumna of the year 1995), and her Doctorate in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

She contracted polio as an infant and spent much of her early childhood in rehabilitation hospitals, including the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation. At her parents’ insistence, Dr. Daniels attended school with her siblings long before mainstreaming was commonplace.
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