Anatomy

Fall Faculty Publications

A new selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16. With the currently changes, we’ve decided to post the publications digitally. Check out the display below:

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

September Faculty Publications

A new selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16. With the currently changes, we’ve decided to post the publications digitally. Check out the display below:

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

June Faculty Publications

A new selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16. With the currently changes, we’ve decided to post the publications digitally. Check out the display below:

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

May Faculty Publications

A new selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16. With the currently changes, we’ve decided to post the publications digitally. Check out the display below:

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

January Faculty Publications

A new selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16.

1. Avegno EM, Middleton JW, Gilpin NW. Synaptic GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala (CeA) of rats depends on slice preparation and recording conditions. Physiol Rep. 2019;7(19):e14245.

2. Conner M, Joshi T, Veerisetty SS, Hutchings J. Coinfection of cytomegalovirus and cryptosporidiosis in a patient with AIDS. ACG Case Rep J. 2019;6(10):e00225.

3. Fontenot J, Spieler B, Hudson C, Boulmay B. Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma–literature review and case report of a 56-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain. Radiol Case Rep. 2019;15(1):39-43.

4. Harrison-Bernard LM, Naljayan MV, Mercante DE, Gunaldo TP, Edwards S. Longitudinal interprofessional education in a graduate physiology course. Adv Physiol Educ. 2019;43(2):241-245.

5. Hoffman LA, Lufler RS, Brown KM, DeVeau K, DeVaul N, Fatica LM, Mussell J, Byram JN, Dunham SM, Wilson AB. A review of U.S. medical schools’ promotion standards for educational excellence. Teach Learn Med. 2019;1-10.

6. Kerut EK, To F, Summers KL, Sheahan C, Sheahan M. Statistical and machine learning methodology for abdominal aortic aneurysm prediction from ultrasound screenings. Echocardiography. 2019;.

7. Patterson CW, Stalder MW, Richardson W, Steele T, Wise MW, St Hilaire H. Timing of free flaps for traumatic wounds of the lower extremity: Have advances in perioperative care changed the treatment algorithm? J Reconstr Microsurg. 2019;35(8)(8):616-621.

8. Samet JM, Fontham E, Alpirez-Guardao M, Sousa-Santana V. Pollution in the americas: A leading cause of disease burden and an opportunity for cancer pre-vention. Salud Publica Mex. 2019;61(4):417-426.

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

December Faculty Publications

A new holly, jolly selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16.

1. Arnold AJ, Thigpen CA, Beattie PF, Kissenberth MJ, Tokish JM, Shanley E. Sport specialization and increased injury frequency in youth baseball players: A prospective study. J Athl Train. 2019;54(10):1115-1122.

2. Carzoli KL, Sharfman NM, Lerner MR, Miller MC, Holmgren EB, Wills TA. Regulation of NMDA receptor plasticity in the BNST following adolescent alcohol exposure. Front Cell Neurosci. 2019;13440.

3. Erbele ID, Miller LS, Mankekar G, Morel CE, Anderson DT, Son LS, Arriaga MA. Cochlear enhancement may precede cochlear obliteration after vestibular schwannoma excision. Otol Neurotol. 2019;.

4. Freundlich A, Badeaux J, Adorno M. Sugammadex versus neostigmine for postoperative nausea and vomiting in adult patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery paralyzed with rocuronium bromide: A systematic review protocol. JBI Database System Rev Implement Rep. 2019;17(10):2187-2192.

5. Gaudet DA, El-Desoky D, Poret JM, Braymer HD, Primeaux SD. Expression of neural markers of gustatory signaling are differentially altered by continuous and intermittent feeding patterns. Physiol Behav. 2019;212112719.

6. Hetzler L, Givens V, Sykes J. The tripod concept of the upper nasal third. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2019;.

7. Tessler O, Guste J, Bartow MJ, Torabi R, Gimenez A, Patel SB, Matatov T, Torabi R, St Hilaire H, Allen B. Stacked lateral thigh perforator flap as a novel option for autologous breast reconstruction. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2019;143(6):1601-1604.

8. Weera MM, Gilpin NW. Biobehavioral interactions between stress and alcohol. Alcohol Res. 2019;40(1):10.35946/arcr.v40.1.04. eCollection 2019.

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

New Books Display to Start the School Year!

The first New Books display for Fall 2018 is now posted on the New Books Shelf (3rd floor of the Ische Library)! This display highlights some course textbooks for medical students as well as other titles of interest for faculty, students, and staff on two of our newest e-book resources: Access Neurology and ClinicalKey!

(* denotes course textbook for medicine)

Access Neurology Titles:

 

ClinicalKey Titles: 

 

Reserve Anatomy Book Now Available as an Ebook

developing humanWe are pleased to announce that The Developing Human: Clinically Oriented Embryology, 10th edition, is now available in an Ebook format.

From the record in the library catalog, click on the link for EBSCOhost Ebooks. We have 3 “copies” available, so we are allowed 3 concurrent online users.

The print edition is on reserve for ANAT 100 – Gross Anatomy and ANAT 101 – Human Prenatal Development.  But we think you’ll find the electronic edition to be much lighter.

E-Books Display!

The Isché Library is kicking off the fall semester by featuring E-book editions of required textbooks! The newest editions of the books on display are available in our online catalog.

The display is located near the 3rd floor elevator along with the links to the current E-book edition. Subjects include physiology, anatomy, dermatology, nursing, biochemistry, pathology, diagnostic examination, anesthesia, obstetrics, and more.

These books and many more are available for online access.

Featured E-books from EBSCOhost:

logoEhost
EBSCOhost E-books may be printed, saved, or emailed one chapter at a time

 

Featured E-books from AccessMedicine:

AccessMedicine    AccessMedicine E-books may be printed one chapter at a time but may not be saved.

 

Featured E-books from LWW Health Library:

lww    LWW Health Library E-books may be printed one chapter at a time but may not be saved. Emailed chapters are valid for 72 hours only.

 

Other Featured E-books:

LWW Health Library – Anatomy and Basic Sciences Collection

lwwhl

The Library is pleased to announce that we now have access to over 40 anatomy and basic sciences books from Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins online through the LWW Health Library platform.

The Premium Basic Sciences Collection includes classic course textbooks, review guides, case studies, and videos.  All of the books have been cataloged and can be accessed from the Library’s INNOPAC catalog.  The LWW Health Library can also be found on the Library’s list of databases.

Below is a quick look at some of these essential resources:

  • Bates’ Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking
  • Clinically Oriented Anatomy (Moore)
  • Color Atlas and Text of Histology (Gartner)
  • Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy
  • Grant’s Dissector
  • Histology: a Text and Atlas (Ross)
  • Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry
  • Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: Pharmacology
  • Neuroanatomy: an Atlas of Structures… (Haines)
  • Neuroanatomy in Clinical Context (Haines)
  • Physiology: Cases and Problems (Costanzo)
  • Principles of Pharmacology (Golan)

Be sure to check out the full product!  We hope these will be useful in your studies!

DRAW IT TO KNOW IT – NEUROANATOMY now available!

DITKI-snag3

The LSUHSC-New Orleans Libraries are pleased to announce that we now have access to the self-directed, alternative learning program, Draw It To Know It – Neuroanatomy.  Our access to Draw It To Know It (DITKI) is available through our subscription to STAT!Ref.

This interactive and hands-on learning tool includes narrated video tutorials, practice exams, a brain atlas, and muscle-nerve correlations.  Each tutorial includes notes, questions, and the drawing tool.

Registration must be initiated on campus in order to authenticate your access on our institutional site license. Once your account has been created, you will also be able to access this resource off campus.

To register for an account on campus:

  • Log in to the STAT!Ref database.
  • Scroll down until you see the Draw It To Know It link and click on it:DITKI-snag5
  • Click where it says CLICK HERE FOR YOUR SUBSCRIPTION…:

DITKI-snag4

  • Fill out the online registration making sure to use your lsuhsc.edu email account.
  • After you receive the email confirmation from Draw It To Know It, you are ready to go!
  • Access Draw It To Know It through our STAT!Ref database or by going directly to the Draw It To Know It web site: http://drawittoknowit.com/.
  • Access is also available using an Apple iPhone or iPad. The app is available for free at the iTunes site. You must be registered with Draw It To Know It in order to use the app.

We hope you find this new resource helpful in your studies!

Happy Belated Birthday, Andeas Vesalius

Page 164 of Andreas Vesalius: De corporis humani fabrica libri septem

 

We missed the 499th birthday?áof Andreas Vesalius who was born on December 31, 1514. 500th year?ácelebrations of the man and his accomplishments are in the works.

The LSUHSC Libraries is lucky enough to own a 1568 edition?áof his De humani corporis fabrica libri septem which is housed in the Isch?® Library Rare Books Room (and is available by appointment only). The first edition of this title is from 1543.

For more information, see this post from NLM’s Circulating Now blog.

Also, you can view the digitized?á1543 edition of De humani corporis fabrica libri septemat the NLM’s Historical Anatomies on the Web?ápage.

 

This Month in History: The Body of Art

As soon as the human body became an object of study and curiosity, art attempted to render it, inside and out. The recreational artist may depict a scene of illness or portraiture, while the specially-commissioned medical artist records anatomical structure and surgical procedure for purposes of instruction, collaboration, and publishing. Well-known pioneers of the modern practice of medical illustration include Leonardo Da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius; their legacy continues well into contemporary culture in tandem with advances in photography and various other image-capturing technology to create a comprehensive visual understanding of medical practice.

LSU Medical School employed its own Medical Arts Department, headed by William Branks Stewart from 1933 until his death in 1950, to observe and document cases as needed. ÔÇ£Would You Like a Portrait of Your Appendix?ÔÇØ asks a Times-Picayune article from 1946–a memorable keepsake, indeed (though you might enjoy this plush version more). Mr. StewartÔÇÖs body of art includes drawings, paintings, photographs, plaster molds, and even animations for use as visual aids in demonstration, in print, and in the classroom. Our Library has made available a digitized collection, aptly named the William Branks Stewart Collection, as a sampling of his works.

Mr. StewartÔÇÖs services were often requested in order to document rare cases and new procedures for later study and review. According to the above article, he would often take the time to familiarize himself with the entire operation in as many as twelve separate instances. A firm understanding of the techniques involved in a procedure and how best to communicate those steps to a student, he found, are necessary skills for the successful medical illustrator. When asked to contextualize his work, Mr. Stewart related his duties to those of an archaeologist with one important difference:” none of them ever had to look down a gastroscope!”

In addition to his professional position as Head of Medical Arts and contributor of drawings to the LSU student-run newspaper, The Tiger, William Branks Stewart was a member of the New Orleans Arts League and the Association of Medical Illustrators. By 1946, he had illustrated eleven textbooks by LSU professors, made plastic prosthetic eyes to replace glass ones, taken moulages (plaster or wax casts) of skin lesions, and even painted names on office doors. He submitted artwork to the Delgado Museum (now the New Orleans Museum of Art), an example of which can be seen here (be sure to take a look at the inscription on the reverse side).

A graduate of the Glasgow School of Arts in Scotland, it appears Mr. Stewart was destined for great things. In a prompted address to readers of The Tiger (page two), he candidly states, “Why did I study art? To make big money? Am I making it? To dodge work? Am I dodging it? Have I failed? No, I am doing something I enjoy, among people I enjoy, and in what I consider to the be most interesting city in America. So what the h—.”

Medical illustrations continue to be of great importance to our students as often photographs alone cannot provide a clear picture of the field under observation. Or, if you are like me, you may appreciate less “icky” renderings of our vicera.

Interested in learning more about the history of medical illustration, art in medicine, or anatomy study? Be sure to take a look at our Library Catalog!

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the Louisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

This Month in History: The Alligator Men

As a Louisiana native or even an adventurous visitor, youÔÇÖve probably fed an alligator a marshmallow or two. WhatÔÇÖs the allure of marshmallows to a wild swamp creature? We may never truly know, but for an animal that will scarf down turtle shells, rocks, lures, beer cans, and shoes, marshmallows are probably the least of its worries.

Profiled in the Times-Picayune for their project in 1951, the self-proclaimed LSU “alligator men” studied the production of acid gastric juice and self-induced hibernation in alligators, as compared to iguanas and chameleons. The stars of this ÔÇ£zooÔÇØ were Dr. Roland Coulson, LSUMC faculty (1944-2004), Dr. Thomas Hernandez, LSUMC faculty (1960-1977) and Chair of Pharmacology, Dr. Fred G. Brazda, LSUMC faculty (1939-1977) and Chair of Biochemistry, and their graduate student, Dr. Herbert C. Dessauer. In the preface of a later work, Alligator Metabolism, Coulson and Hernandez speak to the origin of their honorary titles”: “It is not possible to have done research on alligators for many years without having gained a reputation for eccentricity as a consequence of the choice of experimental animal. One accepts this and learns to live with it. […] By some, an alligator man is tolerated (as a harmless eccentric should be), and by others he is admired for the fearless manner in which he confronts such a ‘terrifying’ beast.”

Though certainly fearless, these doctors chose smaller gators to reduce the risk of injury, and by the time the animals reached a rowdy 20 pounds, they were returned to the swamp. Because alligators produce a large amount of hydrochloric acid during digestion, they perform a more dramatic and more readily observable process of digestion. Alligators are also tougher physically and less prone to blood poisoning, making them easier to study. In addition to their excellent acid production, the test gators self-induced a sort of hibernation in winter despite the fact that researchers kept them in windowless rooms with automatic lights; by abstaining from food and decreasing sugar in the bloodstream, the test subjects did not grow.

The practical application of the research of the “alligator men” may not seem readily apparent, but as Dr. Coulson explains in the newspaper article, ÔÇ£The scientist doesnÔÇÖt have to be working toward the cure of any specific malady [ÔǪ] but often he stumbles upon it by accident, through just a study as ours.ÔÇØ They developed enough material to write numerous journal articles (PubMed author search results hyperlinked above) and monographs. Two books co-authored by Dr. Coulson and Dr. Hernandez are available in the Library: Alligator Metabolism: Studies on Chemical Reactions in Vivo and Biochemistry of the Alligator: A Study of Metabolism in Slow Motion.

Dr. Herbert Dessauer, who began as a humble graduate student and would go on to become Professor Emeritus of molecular biology at LSU Medical Center, passed away earlier this month after a brief illness. We would like to recognize his contributions to not only the scientific community, but also to LSU.?á For more information on the contributions of each of the renowned doctors mentioned in this post, please consult A History of LSU School of Medicine New Orleans, which is available in the Library. When you stop by, be sure to check out our display cases, which are home to various medical artifacts including an analytical balance used by Coulson, Hernandez, and Dessauer.

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the Louisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

The Poetry of Dr. George William Cooper

Dr. Cooper, a one-time anatomy Professor at the LSU Medical School, was also well-renowned for his poetry.?á Recognized for his ÔÇ£consistently good work in poetryÔÇØ by a forum of the National Writers Club in 1951 and awarded the position of Louisiana Poet Laureate from 1973-1976, Dr. Cooper is a?ácommon subject of our Newspaper Clippings Digital Collection. Though the Isch?® Library does not own any of his poetry collections, they are available through InterLibrary Loan.

Excerpted below?á is a poem from one of?áhis collections dedicated to a previous ÔÇ£Glimpse of the PastÔÇØ honoree, Dr. Frank N. Low. I would like to?áshare this poem with our new and returning students, who will surely feel the ÔÇ£grindÔÇØ immediately upon returning to classes: