PubMed

January Faculty Publications

A new selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16.

1. Avegno EM, Middleton JW, Gilpin NW. Synaptic GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala (CeA) of rats depends on slice preparation and recording conditions. Physiol Rep. 2019;7(19):e14245.

2. Conner M, Joshi T, Veerisetty SS, Hutchings J. Coinfection of cytomegalovirus and cryptosporidiosis in a patient with AIDS. ACG Case Rep J. 2019;6(10):e00225.

3. Fontenot J, Spieler B, Hudson C, Boulmay B. Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma–literature review and case report of a 56-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain. Radiol Case Rep. 2019;15(1):39-43.

4. Harrison-Bernard LM, Naljayan MV, Mercante DE, Gunaldo TP, Edwards S. Longitudinal interprofessional education in a graduate physiology course. Adv Physiol Educ. 2019;43(2):241-245.

5. Hoffman LA, Lufler RS, Brown KM, DeVeau K, DeVaul N, Fatica LM, Mussell J, Byram JN, Dunham SM, Wilson AB. A review of U.S. medical schools’ promotion standards for educational excellence. Teach Learn Med. 2019;1-10.

6. Kerut EK, To F, Summers KL, Sheahan C, Sheahan M. Statistical and machine learning methodology for abdominal aortic aneurysm prediction from ultrasound screenings. Echocardiography. 2019;.

7. Patterson CW, Stalder MW, Richardson W, Steele T, Wise MW, St Hilaire H. Timing of free flaps for traumatic wounds of the lower extremity: Have advances in perioperative care changed the treatment algorithm? J Reconstr Microsurg. 2019;35(8)(8):616-621.

8. Samet JM, Fontham E, Alpirez-Guardao M, Sousa-Santana V. Pollution in the americas: A leading cause of disease burden and an opportunity for cancer pre-vention. Salud Publica Mex. 2019;61(4):417-426.

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

December Faculty Publications

A new holly, jolly selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16.

1. Arnold AJ, Thigpen CA, Beattie PF, Kissenberth MJ, Tokish JM, Shanley E. Sport specialization and increased injury frequency in youth baseball players: A prospective study. J Athl Train. 2019;54(10):1115-1122.

2. Carzoli KL, Sharfman NM, Lerner MR, Miller MC, Holmgren EB, Wills TA. Regulation of NMDA receptor plasticity in the BNST following adolescent alcohol exposure. Front Cell Neurosci. 2019;13440.

3. Erbele ID, Miller LS, Mankekar G, Morel CE, Anderson DT, Son LS, Arriaga MA. Cochlear enhancement may precede cochlear obliteration after vestibular schwannoma excision. Otol Neurotol. 2019;.

4. Freundlich A, Badeaux J, Adorno M. Sugammadex versus neostigmine for postoperative nausea and vomiting in adult patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery paralyzed with rocuronium bromide: A systematic review protocol. JBI Database System Rev Implement Rep. 2019;17(10):2187-2192.

5. Gaudet DA, El-Desoky D, Poret JM, Braymer HD, Primeaux SD. Expression of neural markers of gustatory signaling are differentially altered by continuous and intermittent feeding patterns. Physiol Behav. 2019;212112719.

6. Hetzler L, Givens V, Sykes J. The tripod concept of the upper nasal third. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2019;.

7. Tessler O, Guste J, Bartow MJ, Torabi R, Gimenez A, Patel SB, Matatov T, Torabi R, St Hilaire H, Allen B. Stacked lateral thigh perforator flap as a novel option for autologous breast reconstruction. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2019;143(6):1601-1604.

8. Weera MM, Gilpin NW. Biobehavioral interactions between stress and alcohol. Alcohol Res. 2019;40(1):10.35946/arcr.v40.1.04. eCollection 2019.

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

November Faculty Publications

A new selection of articles have been added to the Faculty Publications display in the Ische Library. These eight articles, as well as all of the articles in our Faculty Publications database, are authored by at least one member of our research community here at LSUHSC-New Orleans. Each month the Library is proud to present copies of eight of these publications in a rotating display of 16.

1. Croughan P, Gee RE. How should physicians steward limited resources while ensuring that patients can access needed medicines? AMA J Ethics. 2019;21(8):E630-635.

2. Everett A, Sugarman O, Wennerstrom A, Pollock M, True G, Haywood C, Meyers D, Raines A, Wells K, Johnson A, Arevian AC, Sato J, Springgate B. Community-informed strategies to address trauma and enhance resilience in climate-affected communities. Traumatology (Tallahass Fla). 2019;.

3. Giarratano GP, Barcelona V, Savage J, Harville E. Mental health and worries of pregnant women living through disaster recovery. Health Care Women Int. 2019;40(3):259-277.

4. Lin HY, Callan CY, Fang Z, Tung HY, Park JY. Interactions of PVT1 and CASC11 on prostate cancer risk in african americans. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2019;28(6):1067-1075.

5. Paige J, Garbee D, Yu Q, Kiselov V, Rusnak V, Detiege P. Moving along: Team training for emergency room trauma transfers (T(2)ERT(2)). J Surg Educ. 2019;76(5):1402-1412.

6. Phillippi SW, Beiter K, Thomas CL, Sugarman OK, Wennerstrom A, Wells KB, Trapido E. Medicaid utilization before and after a natural disaster in the 2016 baton rouge-area flood. Am J Public Health. 2019;109(S4):S316-S321.

7. Schroll R, Smith A, Martin MS, Zeoli T, Hoof M, Duchesne J, Greiffenstein P, Avegno J. Stop the bleed training: Rescuer skills, knowledge, and attitudes of hemorrhage control techniques. J Surg Res. 2019;245636-642.

8. Wang H, Garcia JW, Sabottke CF, Spencer DJ, Sejnowski TJ. Feedforward thalamocortical connectivity preserves stimulus timing information in sensory pathways. J Neurosci. 2019;39(39):7674-7688.

Publications cited in the Faculty Publications database are harvested weekly from a variety of sources, such as PubMedSCOPUS, and CINAHL, to name a few. In addition to articles they include books, book chapters, papers, editorials, letters to the editor, and meeting abstracts, all authored by at least one member of the LSUHSC-NO community. The database is maintained by Reference Librarian Kathy Kerdolff and is available to the general public here or via the Library’s webpage. For a PDF of a bibliography of this month’s additions,click here. If you have an article you would like us to highlight or if you have any questions regarding the display or the database, you can contact Kathy Kerdolff.

Update: Link resolver now working in PubMed

The link resolver being used for PubMed is once again working correctly.

If you need assistance with any Library resources, please contact us.

Temporary link resolver for PubMed

The problem with PubMed and the WebBridge Link Resolver is still ongoing, so a new service is in use as a temporary alternative to bring link resolver features to PubMed. When you click on our “Check Full Text” icon in PubMed, a screen similar to the following listing any potential sources to get to the article you need is displayed:

ftf-page

This temporary option uses the coverage information from our E-Journals & E-Books A to Z List. Although it covers many of the journals we receive, it does not include all of our subscribed titles nor our print holdings. Regardless of whether an online source is found for the article, each page will provide a link to the Library’s Catalog so that you can also check there to see if we have that particular journal in print or online.

We are still hoping for a fix so that we can return to using the WebBridge Link Resolver in PubMed, and we apologize for any troubles this temporary change in service has and continues to cause. If you need assistance with this or any other Library resources, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Link resolver not working in PubMed

As a result of the recent change to HTTPS on all NCBI sites, the WebBridge Link Resolver is no longer working in PubMed. When you click the “Check Full Text” icon, you will see this page:

pubmed-lr-revised

Unfortunately, there is no data being sent from PubMed to our link resolver’s system, so you will be unable to check whether the Library has access to an article from PubMed for the foreseeable future. The issue is currently being investigated, but there is no estimate as to when we might have a solution.

In the interim, when you find an article you need you can check whether the Library has access to that journal via INNOPAC, the Library’s online catalog or the E-Journals & E-Books A to Z List. Links to those sources are now provided when you click the “Check Full Text” icon in PubMed.

We have also added options that allow you to search other databases with the PMID: the links displayed for Scopus and MEDLINE via EBSCOhost have the PMID added to provide a quick way to use the link resolver in these two databases to get to the article you originally searched in PubMed. A link is also provided to search MEDLINE through Ovid, and the link resolver is available in this database as well.

We will update as soon as we have more information, but if you need more assistance please do not hesitate to contact us.

Link Resolver and PubMed issues

Recently you may have noticed alerts on PubMed and all other NCBI sites regarding testing. This is to prepare all of their sites to permanently transition to HTTPS, but we have discovered that when this testing occurs it affects the ability to see results from the WebBridge Link Resolver, especially in PubMed.

The next scheduled testing time is Friday, November 4, 2016, from 9am until 1pm CDT:

ncbi-https-test-warning

When testing has commenced, you will see a banner similar to this one:

ncbi-https-testing

During this test period, whenever you click the “Check Full Text” icon for the WebBridge Link Resolver all results will look like this page regardless of whether we have access to the article:

ncbi-https-testing-lr

Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do to get the link resolver to work while NCBI is performing these tests, but there are  alternatives to find out whether the Library has access to the article you need. You can check the journal’s title via INNOPAC, the Library’s online catalog. You can also use MEDLINE through Ovid or EBSCOhost; the link resolver is included in both of these databases and they are not affected by the testing that occurs in PubMed or other NCBI sites.

If you are curious as to why the NCBI sites are changing to HTTPS, this site has all of the information. Additionally, if you need help with this or any other Library resources, please do not hesitate to contact us.

PubMed and security warnings

Today PubMed along with all NCBI sites permanently changed their web addresses to use the HTTPS protocol. Unfortunately, this is now prompting a security warning when using the Library’s off-campus link to PubMed. Although in this case there is no real danger in proceeding, you will need to add a security exception to your browser in order to get to PubMed.

For Chrome, first click “Advanced”

pm-chrome1

Then click the link that begins with “Proceed to…” in order to add the exception to Chrome:

pm-chrome2

In Internet Explorer, click the link “Continue to this website (not recommended)”:

pm-ie

In Firefox, first click the “Add Exception” button:

pm-ff1

Then click “Confirm Security Exception” to add it to Firefox:

pm-ff2

Finally, for those for whom Safari is your browser of choice, you just need to click the “Continue” button in the window that pops up:

pm-safari

If you need any help with this or other Library resources, do not hesitate to contact us.

Happy birthday, PubMed!

birthday cake

The database everyone loves (and hates at times), PubMed, is turning 20!

“PubMed was first released two decades ago in January 1996 as an experimental database under the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) retrieval system. The word “experimental” was dropped from the Web site in April 1997, and on June 26, 1997, a Capitol Hill Press conference officially announced free MEDLINE access via PubMed.”

Pubmed 1996

It’s gone through several redesigns and refinements since 1997.  The staff at NLM and NCBI are constantly improving access, coverage, and ease of use for PubMed and have come up with several features that help searchers.  This article discusses several of these improvements.  Prior to 1997, access to MEDLINE was only available through paid services, such as GRATEFUL MED, DIALOG or in CD ROM format.  Many times users were charged by the minute, by the search, or by the citation to download.  Users had to have their search strategy planned out exactly, login, type it as quickly as possible and then log off while watching the charges add up.  Things have changed!

PubMed 2016

Happy birthday, PubMed!  You have made health sciences research so much easier in the past 20 years!

PubMed changes

Recently, PubMed has announced that it has changed a few popular features that you may notice in your search results:

Within the article summary display, two changes have been made.  The term “Related Citations” has been changed to “Similar Articles”.  It was thought that “Related Citations” was ambiguous.,  The algorithm to generate the results of a search on for similar articles has not changed, just the name of the feature.  Also, the status tag line has been removed from the article summary display.  Most users will not notice this change but experienced searchers may.  The status tag line is still included in the Abstract display.

pm_related_citations_feature_renamed_fig1

The “Save Search” link for creating My NCBI email alerts has been renamed “Create alert” and the “RSS” link has been renamed “Create RSS”.  Once again, these changes will not affect the functionality of PubMed they are only intended to eliminate ambiguity and to make the process smoother.

save_search_rename_fig1

Finally, for those who use PubMed Mobile, there have been updates with a number of styling modifications and additional enhancements including a “Trending articles” feature.

For more information about these changes, you can refer to the New and Noteworthy link on the bottom of the PubMed screen or refer to the NLM Technical Bulletin.

 

HINARI Training at Tulane Med

On Friday, February 6th the Tulane Health Sciences Center Library and the Center for Continuing Education will offer an all day (8 am to 5 pm) accredited (AMA/CHES/MCHES/CECH/MSW-CE/MLA-CE) training class on Access to Global Health Resources. This training session is partially funded by an award from the National Library of Medicine.

The class will cover using PubMed via HINARI at partner institutions in developing countries. The instructor is Lenny Rhine, PhD, Coordinator of the E-Library Training Initiative, a Librarians Without Borders/Medical Library Association project.

Deadline for registration is Wednesday, February 4th. Cost is $25 for pre-registrants and $50 for day of. For more information, please see the attached flyer.

Become a Better PubMed User

Teaching, clinic, committees, research, mentoring, continuing education, administrative duties: With all that on your plate, do you really have time for inefficient literature searches?

The November Library Lunchtime Learning presentation—PubMed Beyond the Basics—is designed to help you get the most out of the premier biomedical citation database. Join us and learn how to more effectively and efficiently search PubMed using advanced features such as Medical Subject Headings, filters, index terms, and the Related Citations and Clinical Queries functions to more easily find the research you need. In addition, we’ll show you how to personalize your PubMed experience via MyNCBI, which will allow you to create bibliographies, automated searches, and separate collections.

The session will be held once at the Dental Campus and once Downtown. If you plan to attend, please RSVP to dentlib@lsuhsc.edu.  But remember, we always welcome drop-in attendees. We hope to see you there!

PubMed Beyond the Basics

November 5, 12-1 p.m.
Copping Room (2309), LSU School of Dentistry

and

November 18, 12-1 p.m.
Computer Laboratory, 4th floor Library, Resource Center Building

 

 

PubMed Beyond the Basics: Library Lunchtime Learning

The Dental Library staff hope you’ll join us on Thursday, March 13, at noon in the Copping Room (2309) as we discuss how to more effectively use PubMed through its more advanced search and citation management features, such as Clinical Queries, Medical Subject Headings, filters, citation matchers, and My NCBI.

If you plan to attend, please RSVP with an email to rpremo@lsuhsc.edu.

PubMed Commons

Attention researchers published in PubMed:

PubMed Commons?áis an exciting new pilot project from the National Library of Medicine that allows researchers to comment on any scientific publication indexed in PubMed and to read the comments of others.

“PubMed Commons is a forum for open and constructive criticism and discussion of scientific issues. It will thrive with high quality interchange from the scientific community.”

Currently, PubMed Commons is in a pilot testing phase and only invited participants can add and view comments in PubMed. However, anyone in the pilot phase can invite a fellow author indexed in PubMed. All they need is your PubMed ID (PMID) and e-mail address. For more information on how to join PubMed Commons click here and stay tuned for the next phase of this project!

Testing, Testing: PubMed Commons Community Forum

PubMed Commons, a new forum community created for online collaboration for ÔÇ£constructive criticism and discussion of scientific issues,ÔÇØ has introduced a pilot version.

During its closed pilot phase, PubMed Commons will be allowing accounts using approved email addresses from PubMed authors to participate. ?áNIH or Wellcome Trust grant recipients can also join and invite others to join. You can test whether you have access here http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedcommons/join/. Users will also need a My NCBI account.

Find answers to frequently asked questions on this page: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedcommons/faq/.