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Monday, August 31, 2015   8:17 AM   |   81°F

Psychiatry

This Month in History: Putting Mind over Matter

Ever been hypnotized? While it may not make you cluck like a chicken, as an alternative therapy, medical hypnosis might help you manage and overcome a number of physical and mental conditions. In the fall of 1959, a few brave medical students were willing to put their bodies and minds at the mercy of LSU Medical School Professor of psychiatry Dr. Carl L. Davis for the purpose of studying the viability of hypnotherapy. Later, the students would be given the opportunity to reverse the stakes and hypnotize Dr. Davis in the spirit of fairness.

The American Medical Association officially backed medical hypnosis for wide use in 1958, though they cautioned against using the method as a form of entertainment and in cases of severe psychological illness. At that time, medical and dental practices used hypnotherapy as a form of anesthesia and in the management of pain. Other fields of medicine that have found use for hypnotherapeutic procedure include dermatology, gastroenterology, cardiology, obstetrics, oncology, post-surgery recovery, and even in the treatment of smoking addiction, eating disorders, and psychosomatic illness through age regression.

While many remain skeptical about the efficacy of hypnotherapy, it is true that more research and standardization of practice will provide insight into the relative benefits and risks of its usage. Dangers to the patient and the doctor are a considerable cause for concern. The mind, being a vast and complex entity, requires a delicate but firm touch. Hypnotism provides the therapist with the ability to wield the power of suggestion over the patient, and so puts the receptive patient in a vulnerable position. For this reason, the move toward more holistic treatment of the individual is vital in addressing his or her needs.

A 1959 Times-Picayune article relates the case of a man who developed asthma every time his mother-in-law would announce her intention to visitÔÇöÔÇ£This man just cannot understand why this would happen since he honestly believes he is fond of [her].ÔÇØ This is an example of a symptom that could possibly benefit from hypnotherapy (or else a nice, long vacation).

Accounts of hypnotism can turn grim, however. In another instance, a patient suffering from self-destructive tendencies developed paralysis in one of her fingers. She was referred to a hypnotist, who alleviated the symptom without addressing the underlying psychological turmoil. Upon release, the woman promptly employed her newly-flexible trigger finger in one final act of self-harm. This is an extreme example, but speaks to the necessity of treating the patient as a whole and of recognizing links between physical and mental manifestations of illness.

The prominent physicians mentioned in these newspaper articles were Professors of psychiatry at LSU Medical School: Dr. Carl L. Davis, Dr. Lucio Gatto, and Dr. Charles Watkins, who also served as the Head of the department. All of them make a few appearances in our Digital Collections as subject and even creator. Dr. Davis appears for his addresses on teen drinking and middle-age rebellion. Dr. Gatto appears for his study on compulsive borrowing. Dr. Watkins is the most prolific figure for his interest in the history of the U. S. Army 64th General Hospital, which has its own Collection, as well as for his medical-cultural mission to Central America, and his role in the care (and commitment) of former Governor Earl K. Long.

Now a far cry from its historic roots in mesmerism and animal magnetism, the current practice of medical hypnosis can be aligned more closely with deep meditation and positive thinking, the power of which is widely acknowledged by doctors and patients alike.

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the Louisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

 

This Month in History: Don’t Just Grin and Bear It

“A woman’s first responsibility is to make an effort to do what she wants to do.” —sage advice?áfrom?áDr. Winston Weese, Emeritus Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at LSU Medical School

You never know what you will chance upon when you browse the LibraryÔÇÖs Newspaper Clippings Collection. Trolling for this monthÔÇÖs topic took me on a journey through various strange perspectives on womenÔÇÖs health.

In 1959, convention speakers discussed ÔÇ£gyno-psychiatry,ÔÇØ ÔÇ£a very basic and superficial type of psychiatry [that] is primarily reassurance. Sometimes a woman is infertile because she believes her husband does not love her. Or vice versa. What we are trying to do today is to make the infertile woman realize that help is possible: that they donÔÇÖt have to just grin and bear it.ÔÇØ One article from 1961 blames men for womenÔÇÖs anxieties: ÔÇ£The American man isnÔÇÖt asserting his male dominance.ÔÇØ The piece is full of quotable gems like, ÔÇ£The wise woman of course, vocally credits her husband with leadership even when he does not have itÔÇØ and ÔÇ£boosts her husbandÔÇÖs ego even though she may be far superior to him in intelligence.ÔÇØ

Some answered the call for by entering the medical field.?áIn 1931, The Southern Medical Association fielded questions about the rise of women as doctors. At the time, women doctors still combated some suppositions about their patients: ÔÇ£Why should they be all women?ÔÇØ and about their personhood with ÔÇ£frequent assertions that such professions as social work and medicine destroy many of the gentler attributes of the feminine nature.ÔÇØ One of the doctors interviewed was the remarkable Dr. Moss of New Orleans, who said, ÔÇ£ThatÔÇÖs a lot of foolishness on the part of people who donÔÇÖt know us.ÔÇØ

Dr. Emma Sadler Moss rejected a teaching career because she was ÔÇ£not gentle enoughÔÇØ and stood as is a?áshining example?áof a woman doing what she wants. She brushed aside the hackneyed image of the young, gentle Southern woman, preferring the allure of the medical profession, where she excelled. After a stint as a medical technologist, Dr. Moss studied for her M. D., which she earned in 1935 from LSU. From there, she earned the title of Director of Pathology at Charity Hospital, clinical professor of pathology at LSU Medical School, and President of the American Society of Clinical Pathology (notably, the first woman President of the society).

Dr. MossÔÇÖ commitment to these institutions lasted for over thirty years until her death in 1970. She received numerous awards for her work in pathology including being recognized as the 1954 Medical Woman of the Year and as one of ÔÇ£The Six Most Successful Women of 1955.ÔÇØ The Library owns two editions of her lauded text, An Atlas of Medical Mycology, which she co-authored with Dr. Albert Louis McQuown. A full listing of her contributions to LSU Medical School and Charity Hospital can be viewed in A History of LSU School of Medicine New Orleans.

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the?áLouisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

New edition of the DSM available through PsychiatryOnline

The fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is now available through the PsychiatryOnline database. The DSM-5?« is the product of more than ten years of effort by hundreds of international experts in all aspects of mental health.

The DSM has been the most comprehensive resource used by health professionals, social workers, and forensic and legal specialists to diagnose and classify mental disorders. In the United States the DSM serves as a universal authority for the diagnosis of psychiatric illnesses. Treatment recommendations, as well as payment by health care providers, are often determined by DSM classifications, so the appearance of a new version has significant practical importance.

The DSM-5?« was published on May 18, 2013, superseding the DSM-IV?«, which was published in 1994. The development of the new edition began with a conference in 1999, and proceeded with the formation of a Task Force in 2007, which developed and field-tested a variety of new classifications. In most respects DSM-5?« is not greatly changed from DSM-IV?«. Notable innovations include dropping Asperger syndrome as a distinct classification; loss of subtype classifications for variant forms of schizophrenia; dropping the “bereavement exclusion” for depressive disorders; a revised treatment of gender identity issues; and a new gambling disorder.

?áAlso featured in PsychiatryOnlineÔÇÖs DSM Library are:

  • Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV-TR?«)
  • DSM-IV-TR?« Handbook of Differential Diagnosis
  • Cases from DSM-IV-TR?« Casebook and Its Treatment Companion

PsychiatryOnline is a web-based psychiatry portal that includes books, journals, textbooks, practice guidelines, self-assessment, clinical and research news and medication patient handouts. LSUHSC-NO faculty, staff, and students can access PsychiatryOnline on campus, or off campus with use of a valid LSUHSC library barcode and PIN. Visit our PsychiatryOnline electronic resource page for more info. You can also connect to PsychiatryOnline by visiting the LibraryÔÇÖs website, and then selecting the ÔÇ£Online ResourcesÔÇØ category.

This Month in History: A Nation of Neurotics

In America, methods of care for our mentally ill have become intertwined with the politics of universal healthcare, hospital administration, and prevention of violent crime, all of which suffer under an increasingly budget-cut government. This issue is not a new one, however. The Newspaper Clippings Digital Collection of the Isch?® Library shows an emerging pattern: a pattern of need. Hospitals and treatment centers need enough beds for psychiatric patients; hospitals need staff to treat those patients; police officers, clergy, and even the general public need training to assess and assist the mentally ill.

Linkages of mental illness and criminal tendencies also surface. In recent news, LSU psychiatrist Dr. Jose Calderon-Abbo joined the vice presidentÔÇÖs task force on gun violence; he has also partnered up with Tulane public health criminology expert Dr. Peter Scarf to present a paper of similar topic to the House Subcommittee on Crime, terrorism, and Homeland Security at a hearing on The Youth Promise act.

Not only do mental illness and crime sometimes occur simultaneously, but those charged with apprehending the mentally ill are often the same people who apprehend criminals.?á One of our newspaper clippings from 1961, entitled ÔÇ£How Police Can Help Mentally Ill,ÔÇØ addresses the need for officers of the law to be properly trained on how to interact with, assess urgency of treatment for, and detain suspects who appear to be suffering from illness, loss of competency, or loss of sanity.

The clergy are often called upon to assist the mentally ill; one article, ÔÇ£Help of Clergy Asked by Many: Role of Churchmen for Mentally Ill Cited,ÔÇØ explains how the clergy ought to be well versed in tactics to understand and aid their congregations. Examples of tactics used to interact with those in need in the include: a manual from 1954 ÔÇ£How to Recognize and Handle Abnormal PeopleÔÇØ by Robert A. Matthews and Loyd W. Rowland, former director of the Louisiana Association for mental health and former Head of the department of psychiatry and neurology, ?áin addition to a 1960 New Orleans officer training film, ÔÇ£Booked for Safekeeping,ÔÇØ produced by George C. Stoney.

In 1961, the name of the game was “expedite”: complex legislature required the approval of a hospital director, an order of commitment signed by the coroner, a psychiatrist, and a responsible party, and approval from a civil judge. Convoluted commitment laws and lack of funding for psychiatric facilities and staff were concerns at this time, but these concerns continue today as the Greater New Orleans area loses beds at Charity Hospital and MandevilleÔÇÖs Southeast Louisiana Hospital.

In the words of Dr. Robert A. Matthews, former head of the department of neuropsychiatry at LSUHSC from 1950-1957, ÔÇ£While we are passing the hat around for money to fight polio, heart disease, cancer, tuberculosis and other maladies, we ought also to be financing some exploration in to the cause and cure of emotional storms and mental defectiveness. We are fast becoming a nation of neurotic people.ÔÇØ

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the Louisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

Preparing Students for Best Jobs

Money Magazine came out with it’s list The 50 Best Jobs in America in the November issue. LSUHSC New Orleans is preparing its students for many of these.
#4 Physical Therapist
#12 Dentist
#13 Nurse Anesthetist
#19 Occupational Therapist
#25 Emergency Room Physician
#27 Director of Nursing
#29 Psychiatrist
#34 Primary Care Physician
#44 Speech-Language Pathologist
#46 Physical Therapy Director

Dept. of Psychiatry gets the Gold

Congratulations to LSUHSC’s Department of Psychiatry, who received a Psychiatric Services Achievement Award for their work with the St. Bernard Family Resiliency Project. This is the top Psychiatric Services honor bestowed by the world’s largest psychiatric organization.

The LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Department of Psychiatry was recognized for “successfully integrating mental health services into the school system, youth leadership, and community outreach for children and families recovering from the traumatic effects of Hurricane Katrina,” via the St. Bernard Family Resiliency Project.

Read more about the project in Psychiatric Services 2010 61: 1039-1041

77 oilspill links (con’t)

Continued from here
Mental Health
69. Traumatic Incident Stress: Information for Deepwater Horizon Response Workers and Volunteers ÔÇô CDC

70. Mississippi Dept. of Mental Health ÔÇô oil spill resources

71. Alabama Dept. of Mental Health – Gulf Coast Oil Crisis Assistance

72. Louisiana Dept. of Mental Health

73. The Gulf Oil Disaster: Developing a Positive Outlook in the Face of Tragedy (American Psychological Association)

74. Shore Up Your Resilience to Manage Distress Caused by the Oil Disaster in the Gulf (American Psychological Association)

Mobile apps
75. Oil spill tracker & reporting tool for Android phones

76. MoGo: Mobile Gulf Observatory: Oiled wildlife tracker & reporting tool for iPhone

77. Deepwater Horizon Response Text Message Alerts

And for a little lagniappe, the best related t-shirt money can buy**:

** Solely the opinion of the author. LSUHSC-NO in no way supports, condones or authorizes the purchase of above product.

unhappy anniversary ya’ll. See you in 154 days.

DSM-5 solicits comments

The fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) will be published in May 2013 and will reflect substantial changes for diagnosis of mental disorders. One of the biggest may concern children who are currently diagnosed as bipolar. In a move that could potentially change mental health practice all over America, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) includes a new diagnosis: “temper dysregulation disorder”, which would diagnose children with explosive moods as having a brain or biological dysfunction, and not necessarily lifelong condition such as bipolar.

The APA has published Proposed Draft Revisions to DSM Disorders and Criteria, and welcomes public comment.

The library offers full text online access to the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) through Psychiatry Online and Stat!Ref.

PsychiatryOnlineBook of the Month: Eating Disorders

Just in time for Mental Health Month comes PsychiatryOnline.com’s Book of the Month for May: Yager & Power’s Clinical Manual of Eating Disorders.

ACCESS NOW: Clinical Manual of Eating Disorders

Clinical Manual of Eating Disorders provides sound therapeutic advice based on current research and clinical practice. It includes detailed discussions of various aspects of assessment and treatment, featuring up-to-date evidence- and consensus-based information. Ranging from the determination of initial treatment approaches to problems posed by unique groups of patients, it marks the first APPI volume specifically directed toward the clinical management of patients with eating disorders-and the first book to focus squarely on what psychiatrists need to know about the clinical assessment and management of patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorders, and obesity.

You can access the Book of the Month from the home page, at www.PsychiatryOnline.com. You’ll have access to Clinical Manual of Eating Disorders as a PDF download for the month of May.

Off campus? Use this link: http://0-www.psychiatryonline.com.innopac.lsuhsc.edu/

State Report Cards

It’s that time of year again, when various agencies grade the states on a variety of social issues:

  • From the National Center on Family Homelessness: Louisiana ranks 46th (up from 48th in 2005) in Child Homelessness; the short report also states that 1 in 28 children in Louisiana do not know where their next meal will come from.
  • From the National Alliance on Mental Illness: Louisiana gets a D for our mental health care system; of course, the overall grade for the United States was also a D.
  • From the Pennington Biomedical Research Center: Louisiana received a D in its Louisiana Report Card on Physical Activity and Health for Children and Youth.
  • Science and Psychiatry

    For February only, download a free PDF copy of Solomon Snyder’s Science and Psychiatry: Groundbreaking Discoveries in Molecular Neuroscience. A free, monthly book download is part of the subscription from Psychiatry Online, your one-stop online shop for (free) psychiatric textbooks.

    Solomon Snyder has been instrumental in the establishment of modern psychopharmacology?óÔé¼ÔÇØas a pioneer in the identification of receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs and in the explanation of the actions of psychotropic agents. Science and Psychiatry is a collection of some of his best scientific papers, publications ranging over forty years that represent important advances in psychopharmacology and molecular biology. Audacious and unanticipated when they first appeared, these papers opened up new areas of understanding and revolutionized the modern study of the brain. Republished here, they show why fundamental research into the ?óÔé¼?ômessengers of the mind?óÔé¼?Ø is as essential for clinicians as for researchers.

    You can access the book from PsychiatryOnline’s home page:
    http://0-www.psychiatryonline.com.innopac.lsuhsc.edu/
    (requires log-in off campus)