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Friday, May 29, 2015   3:32 AM   |   78°F

Pharmacology

FDA Sets New Standards for Labels

The FDA released a new rule yesterday regarding the labeling of prescriptions and biological products which affect pregnancy, lactation and reproduction.

From the press release: “The final rule replaces the current product letter categories – A, B, C, D and X – used to classify the risks of using prescription drugs during pregnancy with three detailed subsections that describe risks within the real-world context of caring for pregnant women who may need medication.”

The new rule will go into effect by June 20, 2015.

Faculty Publications May Display

The Library’s Faculty Publications display, located on the first floor of the Library, has been updated with eight new articles for the months of May and June. The new article array covers topics from alcohol intoxication’s impact on spinal injuries, to the linkage between schizophrenia and chronic LSD usage, to nursing in catastrophe.

LSUHSC-NO authors are shown in bold print:

  1. Crutcher CL, Ugiliweneza B, Hodes JE, Kong M, Boakye M. Alcohol intoxication and its effects on traumatic spinal cord injury outcomes. J Neurotrauma. 2014.
  2. Hong S, Alapure BV, Lu Y, Tian H, Wang Q. 12/15-lipoxygenase deficiency reduces densities of mesenchymal stem cells in the dermis of wounded and unwounded skin. Br J Dermatol. 2014.
  3. Leblanc KG, Jr, Monheit GD. Understanding and use of the American Joint Committee on Cancer seventh edition guidelines for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: A survey of dermatologic surgeons. Dermatol Surg. 2014.
  4. Martin DA, Marona-Lewicka D, Nichols DE, Nichols CD. Chronic LSD alters gene expression profiles in the mPFC relevant to schizophrenia. Neuropharmacology. 2014.
  5. Molina PE, Amedee AM, Lecapitaine NJ, Zabaleta J, Mohan M, Winsauer P, Vande Stouwe C, McGoey R, Auten MW, Lamotte L, Chandra LC, Birke L. Modulation of gut-specific mechanisms by chronic Delta9-THC administration in male rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus: A systems biology analysis. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2014.
  6. Park EP, Boulmay BC. Images in clinical medicine. herpes labialis and facial-nerve paralysis. N Engl J Med. 2014 ;370(11):1048.
  7. Polhemus DJ, Lefer DJ. Emergence of hydrogen sulfide as an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule in cardiovascular disease. Circ Res. 2014; 114(4):730-737.
  8. Sterling YM. Nursing ‘caring’ during catastrophic events: Theoretical, research, and clinical insights. Int J Human Caring. 2014; 18(1):60-65.

These articles are part of the Library’s Faculty Publications Database, which is maintained by Reference Librarian, Kathy Kerdolff. The database includes publications authored by LSUHSC-New Orleans faculty, researchers, and students since 1998. It is updated weekly with new articles harvested from a variety of citation sources: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL, etc.

The display highlights sixteen articles at a time, rotating eight new articles each month. You can find more information about the database and listings for our current and past displays from Library’s Faculty Publications landing page: http://www.lsuhsc.edu/library/databases/facpubs.aspx.

To add your faculty publications to the database and display, or for questions about either, please contact Kathy Kerdolff.

The 6th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day

Got Drugs? ThatÔÇÖs the question the National Prescription Drug Take Back Initiative is asking. The program promotes an opportunity to properly dispose of expired and unneeded prescription drugs. In recent years, over 2 million pounds of prescription drugs were taken out of circulation and disposed of properly. ?áAccording to the Environmental Protection Agency, there has been no evidence of human health effects from prescription drug remnants on the environment thus far, however precautionary measures are still in affect to prevent cases from developing. So while you embark on this year’s spring cleaning, keep prescription drugs in mind.

Save the Date:

Saturday, April 27, 2013
10:00 am – 2:00 pm

 

For more info, visit:

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/

To find a drop off location near you, visit:

https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/NTBI/NTBI-PUB.pub;jsessionid=F97E8C13E24A4F4158917E505D922D9A?_flowExecutionKey=_c3781D16F-8320-60D6-9549-1E08043E201E_k2BCC5296-9265-E6B3-A22D-C9656693160A

 

 

 

This Month in History: The Alligator Men

As a Louisiana native or even an adventurous visitor, youÔÇÖve probably fed an alligator a marshmallow or two. WhatÔÇÖs the allure of marshmallows to a wild swamp creature? We may never truly know, but for an animal that will scarf down turtle shells, rocks, lures, beer cans, and shoes, marshmallows are probably the least of its worries.

Profiled in the Times-Picayune for their project in 1951, the self-proclaimed LSU “alligator men” studied the production of acid gastric juice and self-induced hibernation in alligators, as compared to iguanas and chameleons. The stars of this ÔÇ£zooÔÇØ were Dr. Roland Coulson, LSUMC faculty (1944-2004), Dr. Thomas Hernandez, LSUMC faculty (1960-1977) and Chair of Pharmacology, Dr. Fred G. Brazda, LSUMC faculty (1939-1977) and Chair of Biochemistry, and their graduate student, Dr. Herbert C. Dessauer. In the preface of a later work, Alligator Metabolism, Coulson and Hernandez speak to the origin of their honorary titles”: “It is not possible to have done research on alligators for many years without having gained a reputation for eccentricity as a consequence of the choice of experimental animal. One accepts this and learns to live with it. […] By some, an alligator man is tolerated (as a harmless eccentric should be), and by others he is admired for the fearless manner in which he confronts such a ‘terrifying’ beast.”

Though certainly fearless, these doctors chose smaller gators to reduce the risk of injury, and by the time the animals reached a rowdy 20 pounds, they were returned to the swamp. Because alligators produce a large amount of hydrochloric acid during digestion, they perform a more dramatic and more readily observable process of digestion. Alligators are also tougher physically and less prone to blood poisoning, making them easier to study. In addition to their excellent acid production, the test gators self-induced a sort of hibernation in winter despite the fact that researchers kept them in windowless rooms with automatic lights; by abstaining from food and decreasing sugar in the bloodstream, the test subjects did not grow.

The practical application of the research of the “alligator men” may not seem readily apparent, but as Dr. Coulson explains in the newspaper article, ÔÇ£The scientist doesnÔÇÖt have to be working toward the cure of any specific malady [ÔǪ] but often he stumbles upon it by accident, through just a study as ours.ÔÇØ They developed enough material to write numerous journal articles (PubMed author search results hyperlinked above) and monographs. Two books co-authored by Dr. Coulson and Dr. Hernandez are available in the Library: Alligator Metabolism: Studies on Chemical Reactions in Vivo and Biochemistry of the Alligator: A Study of Metabolism in Slow Motion.

Dr. Herbert Dessauer, who began as a humble graduate student and would go on to become Professor Emeritus of molecular biology at LSU Medical Center, passed away earlier this month after a brief illness. We would like to recognize his contributions to not only the scientific community, but also to LSU.?á For more information on the contributions of each of the renowned doctors mentioned in this post, please consult A History of LSU School of Medicine New Orleans, which is available in the Library. When you stop by, be sure to check out our display cases, which are home to various medical artifacts including an analytical balance used by Coulson, Hernandez, and Dessauer.

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the Louisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

2,000-year-old Medicine Discovered in a Shipwreck

Would you trust a medicine that’s been under water for a couple of millennia??áAn early edition article (and a link straight to the PDF) in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzes tablets found in a sealed container that was part of the material recovered from the a wreck in the Mediterranean sea off the coast of Tuscany in Italy. The abstract for the article states, “The composition and the form of the Pozzino tablets seem to indicate that they were used for ophthalmic purposes.”

The article is certainly generating a lot of press, from Wired to the Smithsonian to the BBC?áto the Washington Post.

Link to the pdf of the article is available to LSUHSC faculty, staff & students. It can be accessed off-campus with a valid LSUHSC library barcode & PIN. You can find more information at our remote access webpage.

MicroMedex available for Android

androidsMicromedex Drug Information is now available for Android phones.

We’ve previously mentioned the Drug Information app for Blackberry and iPhone way back in January 2010, it’s nice to see this drug information app for that *other* mobile operating system.

Happy Anniversary to Streptomycin

October 19th was the 67th anniversary of the discovery of streptomycin which proved to be effective against tuberculosis and other penicillin resistant infectious diseases.

1st Chemotherapy Agent Used 100 years ago

Paul Ehrlich developed what is now recognized as the first chemotherapy agent 100 years ago. On August 31, 1909 his 606th compound of arsenobenzene was developed. He was searching for a way to treat syphillis.