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Thursday, August 28, 2014   6:18 PM   |   87°F

TEDMED 2014

On September 10-12, the library will host a live streaming broadcast of TEDMED 2014: Unlocking Imagination in Service of Health and Medicine in the Library Commons.

TEDMED is an annual gathering of innovative pioneers in different disciplines and industries brought together to address the the big problems in healthcare. Speakers tell engaging personal stories in short segments, each focused on the future of health and medicine.

The 2014 conference will be broadcast from both Washington DC and San Francisco and co-hosted by eight individuals, including Sheri Fink, author of Five Days at Memorial: life and death in a storm-ravaged hospital. For a full list of sessions and speakers, the Stage Program is available here.

Stay tuned for more details. In the meantime, here are a few of the most viewed TEDMED talks from previous years:
How did GenX inspire next-gen medical imaging? Lee Stein, TEDMED 2011.
When is a hacksaw a necessary medical device? Mark Hyman, TEDMED 2010.
Can we end aging? Aubrey de Grey, TEDMED 2009.

FASEB Shows Where NIH Funding Goes

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) recently updated their NIH State Information Factsheets which provide information on NIH funding in each state. The factsheets are presented as easy to read and print PDFs with a summary of funding information and how this funding benefits the economy of the state.

According to The National Institutes of Health (NIH) website, NIH-funded medical research has significant positive impacted the health of Americans today through its funding of initiatives like Integra LifeSciences’ Matrix Wound Dressing, an artificial skin for burn victims.

More than 80 percent of the NIH’s budget goes to over 300,000 research personnel at more than 2,500 universities and research institutions throughout the United States. In addition, about 6,000 scientists work in NIH’s own Intramural Research laboratories.

NIH’s mission is to seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and apply that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.

Technology Learning @ the Library

Start the new academic year by learning how technology can help make your life easier. The Library Lunchtime Learning program will be coming to the downtown campus for a Hands-on Technology Expo on July 21. We’ll be rounding up some of your favorite gadgets, demonstrating how to access library resources from your mobile device, and talking about education apps. Bring your own tech tool too!

If you plan to attend, please RSVP to rpremo@lsuhsc.edu. However, we welcome drop-ins. And if you can’t make it, send an e-mail and we’ll send the handouts to you.

Details:

July 21, 12-1 p.m.

Computer Laboratory, 4th floor Library, Resource Center Building

It Came From the Stacks

In honor of everyone using their time this summer to study for their board exams, this month’s “It Came From the Stacks” post is about a board review text.  However, you might not want to use it for your boards as it was published 107 years ago.

Underwood & Gabell’s Aids to Dental Surgery is one volume in their “Student’s aids series.”  The book is small and as the author states in his preface, “condense(s) into a concise form that department of the science of dental surgery which is capable of such treatment.”  Underwood states that the books concentrates on matters which are likely to be included on examinations.  “If the book smooths the path of any of the large body of dental students, with whose education and welfare my daily work has been and is so largely concerned, I shall feel that its object has been accomplished.”

Within this slim, 126 page book, the authors cover the breadth of dental science including bacteriology, hygiene, injuries and illnesses of the pulp, periosteum, mucous membrane, and jaws, extraction of teeth, and diseases arising from diseases of the teeth and gums.

aids to dental surgery

LSUHSC-NO Libraries is lucky enough to hold one of only 12 copies of this work in the world.  If you’d like to come take a look at this book or any of our more recent board review materials, please contact us or stop in to see us.

NIH Launches 3D Print Exchange

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, a public website that enables users to share, download, and edit 3D print files related to health and science. These files can be used, for example, to print custom laboratory equipment and models of bacteria and human anatomy. The NIH 3D Print Exchange also provides video tutorials and additional resources with instruction on 3D modeling software to enable users to customize and create 3D prints.

Creating a model for print can take hours, even for an experienced user. 3D Print Exchange has created novel, web-based tools that allow users to generate high-quality and scientifically-relevant 3D-printable models in only minutes, simply by uploading a file or typing in a database accession code. Users can submit models to the 3D Print Exchange database and openly share tips and software tricks in the discussion forum.

Link resolver now working in Web of Science

The WebBridge Link Resolver is once again working correctly for Web of Science. We apologize for what was hopefully a slight interruption in the service, but please do not hesitate to contact us if you need any assistance.

Alert! New Faculty Publications on Display!

Our Faculty Publications display, located on the first floor of the Library, has been updated with eight new articles for the months of June and July.

LSUHSC-NO authors are shown in bold print:Faculty publications June 2014

1. Aiyar A, Quayle AJ, Buckner LR, Sherchand SP, Chang TL, Zea AH, Martin DH, Belland RJ. Influence of the tryptophan-indole-IFNgamma axis on human genital chlamydia trachomatis infection: Role of vaginal co-infections. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2014;472.
2. Dimitriades VR, Brown AG, Gedalia A. Kawasaki disease: Pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2014;16(6):423-014-0423-x.
3. Domingues MJ, Rambow F, Job B, Papon L, Liu W, Larue L, Bonaventure J. Beta-catenin inhibitor ICAT modulates the invasive motility of melanoma cells. Cancer Res. 2014;74(7):1983-1995.
4. Kaye AD, Okanlawon OJ, Urman RD. Clinical performance feedback and quality improvement opportunities for perioperative physicians. Adv Med Educ Pract. 2014;5115-123.
5. Liu L, Richard J, Kim S, Wojcik EJ. Small molecule screen for candidate antimalarials targeting plasmodium kinesin-5. J Biol Chem. 2014;289(23):16601-16614.
6. Raber PL, Thevenot P, Sierra R, Wyczechowska D, Halle D, Ramirez ME, Ochoa AC, Fletcher M, Velasco C, Wilk A, Reiss K, Rodriguez PC. Subpopulations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells impair T cell responses through independent nitric oxide-related pathways. Int J Cancer. 2014;134(12):2853-2864.
7. Siddoway B, Hou H, Yang H, Petralia R, Xia H. Synaptic activity bidirectionally regulates a novel sequence-specific S-Q phosphoproteome in neurons. J Neurochem. 2014;128(6):841-851.
8. Thounaojam US, Cui J, Norman SE, Butera RJ, Canavier CC. Slow noise in the period of a biological oscillator underlies gradual trends and abrupt transitions in phasic relationships in hybrid neural networks. PLoS Comput Biol. 2014;10(5):e1003622.

These articles are part of the Library’s Faculty Publications Database, which is maintained by Reference Librarian, Kathy Kerdolff. The database includes publications authored by LSUHSC-New Orleans faculty, researchers, and students since 1998. It is updated weekly with new articles harvested from a variety of citation sources: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL, etc.
The display highlights sixteen articles at a time, rotating eight new articles each month. You can find more information about the database and listings for our current and past displays from Library’s Faculty Publications landing page: http://www.lsuhsc.edu/library/databases/facpubs.aspx.
To add your faculty publications to the database and display, or for questions about either, please contact Kathy Kerdolff.

Elevated Walkway Closure

According to facilities, access to the Resource Center Building (and the Library Commons) will be via the 1st floor only (and with an LSUHSC ID) while the Isché Library is closed for the 4th of July Holiday.

Here’s the full-text of their message:

From 6:00 PM Thursday, July 3rd, to 6:30 AM Monday, July 7th, the elevated walkway from the S. Roman St. Parking Garage to the Walk-To-Wellness (ramp) will be closed for resurfacing.  Consequently, there will not be any access to any Downtown Campus buildings via the garage 3rd floor and walkway during this closure.

During this time, access to the Medical Education Building (MEB), Allied Health/Nursing Building (AHNB), Resource Center Building (RCB) and Lions/LSU Clinics Building (LEC) will be through the 1st floor entrance of each building.  Access to the CSRB will be through the loading dock or through the connecting bridge on the fourth & fifth floors of the LEC.  In the S. Roman St. Garage, all pedestrian traffic will be routed to the 1st floor.  Access along the Walk-To-Wellness and between the AHNB, CSRB, LEC, MEB, and the Walk-To-Wellness will not be affected.

The walkway and 3rd floor garage elevator lobby will reopen at 6:30 AM on Monday, July 7th. 

Micromedex

The Libraries have lost access to the Micromedex database as of July 1, 2014. We were included in a contract from the Healthcare Services Division that wasn’t renewed.

Alternative Databases include:

For additional assistance, please contact a Reference Librarian.

NEW EBOOKS TO ADD TO YOUR SUMMER READING LIST!

KnowledgeKnowledgeKnowledgeWe are happy to announce the addition of 10 new eBooks to our electronic collection.Knowledge

The first four ebooks are available Rittenhouse R2 Digital Library:Health Sci Lib book
Advancing your career: concepts of professional nursing, by Rose Kearney-Nunnery. (5th ed. 2012) [The print edition is on reserve at the Circulation Desk: WY 16 K21a 2012]
Essentials of nursing research: appraising evidence for nursing practice, by Denise F. Polit and Cheryl Tatano Beck. (8th ed. 2014)
Urinalysis and body fluids, by Susan King Strasinger and Marjorie Schaub Di Lorenzo. (6th ed. 2014)
Foundations of aural rehabilitation: children, adults, and their family members, by Nancy Tye-Murray. (4th ed. 2015)

The remaining 6 ebooks are available from EBSCOhost:
How to read a paper: the basics of evidence-based medicine, by Trisha Greenhalgh. (5th ed. 2014)
Health sciences librarianship, edited by M. Sandra Wood. (1st ed. 2014)
Health Promotion and Aging: Practical Applications for Health Professionals, by David Haber. (6th ed. 2013)
Project planning and management: a guide for CNLs, DNPs, and nurse executives, edited by James L. Harris [and others]. (1st ed. 2011)
Teach beyond your reach: an instructor’s guide to developing and running successful distance learning classes, workshops, training sessions, and more, by Robin Neidorf. (2nd ed. 2012)

Independence Day Hours

Vintage Card

Vintage Card

 

 

On Thursday, July 3rd, the Isché Library will close at 6 pm and the Dental Library will close at 5 pm. Both the Dental & Isché Libraries will be closed on Friday, July 4th and remain closed on Saturday, July 5th.

The Dental Library will reopen on Sunday, July 6th at 11:30 am and the Isché Library will reopen at 1:30 pm; they will resume their normal schedules.

Happy 4th and watch out for the heat & the fireworks.

Link Resolver Tips: OCLC

Select OCLC databases have recently been configured to work with the Library’s WebBridge Link Resolver. If you perform a search in ArticleFirst, ECO (Electronic Collections Online), ERIC, or MEDLINE from the list of available databases in OCLC, you now have the opportunity to check whether the library has access to that particular article or resource.

Once you perform a search for a topic, click the title for the desired reference:

OCLC Article Search Result

 On the subsequent summary screen, you will see the Library’s link resolver icon along with “LSUHSC-NO Check Full Text:”

OCLC LR

After clicking on the icon or text, you will then see a page with any available sources for the citation:

OCLC LR Sources

If you need more information about the WebBridge Link Resolver, a handout and LibGuide are available.

Summer Reading List: Faculty Publications

Faculty publications June 2014The Library’s Faculty Publications display has been updated with eight new articles for the months of June and July. The display highlights sixteen articles at a time, rotating eight new articles in each month. The display is located near the Library’s internal elevator, which is on the first floor of the library.
These articles are part of the Library’s Faculty Publications Database, which is maintained by Reference Librarian, Kathy Kerdolff. The database includes publications authored by LSUHSC-New Orleans faculty, researchers, and students since 1998. It is updated weekly with new articles harvested from a variety of indexes, such as PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL.
You can find more information about the database and listings for our current and past displays from Library’s Faculty Publications landing page: http://www.lsuhsc.edu/library/databases/facpubs.aspx.
To add your faculty publications to the database and display, or for questions about either, contact Kathy Kerdolff.

LSUHSC-NO authors are shown in bold print:

1. Armstrong ML, Duncan CL, Stokes JO, Pereira D. Association of caregiver health beliefs and parenting stress with medication adherence in preschoolers with asthma. J Asthma. 2014;51(4):366-372.

2. Chan TF, Lin WT, Huang HL, Lee CY, Wu PW, Chiu YW, Huang CC, Tsai S, Lin CL, Lee CH. Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with components of the metabolic syndrome in adolescents. Nutrients. 2014;6(5):2088-2103.

3. Espinoza LR, Helliwell P. Psoriatic arthritis: Mary Stults Sherman, a forgotten figure in its history. Clin Rheumatol. 2014.

4. Khan N, Abbas AM, Almukhtar RM, Cole EB, Khan AN. Adherence and efficacy of screening for low bone mineral density among ulcerative colitis patients treated with corticosteroids. Am J Gastroenterol. 2014;109(4):572-578.

5. Lewis DL, Butts CJ, Moreno-Walton L. Facing the danger zone: The use of ultrasound to distinguish cellulitis from abscess in facial infections. Case Rep Emerg Med. 2014

6. Paul D, Soignier RD, Minor L, Tau H, Songu-Mize E, Gould HJ,3rd. Regulation and pharmacological blockade of sodium-potassium ATPase: A novel pathway to neuropathy. J Neurol Sci. 2014;340(1-2):139-143.

7. Reed JR, Cawley GF, Ardoin TG, Dellinger B, Lomnicki SM, Hasan F, Kiruri LW, Backes WL. Environmentally persistent free radicals inhibit cytochrome P450 activity in rat liver microsomes. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2014;277(2):200-209.

8. Yano J, Palmer GE, Eberle KE, Peters BM, Vogl T, McKenzie AN, Fidel PL,Jr. Vaginal epithelial cell-derived S100 alarmins induced by candida albicans via pattern recognition receptor interactions are sufficient but not necessary for the acute neutrophil response during experimental vaginal candidiasis. Infect Immun. 2014;82(2):783-792.

 

It came from the stacks

This month we are highlighting a very interesting find from the Dental Library: Wit Love Frum Cousin Sylveste by Fred J. Wolfe D.D.S.  This collection of original letters documents a small portion of the history of Louisiana dentistry, the Louisiana Dental Association, and Louisiana heritage.

Fred J. Wolfe D.D.S. was a New Orleans dentist who graduated from dental school in 1908 and established a practice on Canal Street.  He served as President of the Louisiana Dental Association from 1927-1928.  Beginning in the Summer of 1931, Dr. Wolfe authored letters published in Impressions, “A Journal of Friendly Relations published quarterly by the Louisiana State Dental Society”.  The regular column, A Letter from Cousin Sylveste, detailed the state of Louisiana dentistry, the events that took place at Louisiana and national dental meetings, and daily life as a Louisiana dentist.  Each letter was written in an irreverent Cajun dialect and pokes fun at the profession, meeting presenters, society leaders, and Louisiana culture.  The last letter was published in the last issue of Impressions (1938 Summer: 7(3): 13-4) but Wit Love Frum Cousin Sylveste contains a special unpublished “Au Revoir frum Sylveste” letter dated May 18, 1939.  The volume is signed by the author and many of the personalities who appear within the letters and was presented as a gift to the Louisiana State University School of Medicine Library in memory of Leo J. Schoeny, D.D.S.. an editor of the journal Impressions.

wit love

If you would like to take a look at this or any of the other special holdings in the Dental Library, please contact us.  We are happy to show off our collection!

Uncovering more truths about Richard III

"Richard III, uncle of Elizabeth of York, great uncle of Henry VIII by Lisby in House of York, List of English monarchs, Richard III of England on Fotopedia - Images for Humanity " by lisby1 is licensed under CC BY 2.0

“Richard III, uncle of Elizabeth of York, great uncle of Henry VIII by Lisby in House of York, List of English monarchs, Richard III of England on Fotopedia – Images for Humanity ” by lisby1 is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Richard III reigned as King of England from 1483 until he was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, thus closing the final chapter of the decades-long Wars of the Roses and ushering in the age of the Tudors. He is one of more infamous monarchs in British history, with opinions ranging from him as the hunchback usurper who had his nephews murdered as popularized by Shakespeare, to that of a trustworthy person who was simply caught up in the battle for control of the English crown.* Aside from his interest to scholars and drama enthusiasts, we are finding more and more about Richard III the man and his medical conditions as a result of the discovery and continuing analysis of his remains.

As a defeated monarch, Richard III was not treated to a royal burial after his death. Rumors persisted throughout the centuries as to the fate of his body, and, incredibly, remains discovered during an archaeological dig under a car park in the city of Leicester and subsequent DNA analysis confirmed that Richard III had been found.

One of the most recent discoveries in the ongoing analysis of the remains affects the portrayal of his being a hunchback as described in Shakespeare’s Richard III. An article published in the May 31, 2014, issue of Lancet by Appleby, et al, reports that Richard suffered from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, but not to such an extent to cause him to appear as the physically deformed monster of the play. According to the analysis, his mobility would not have been affected by the condition, and a clever tailor could even have compensated for any noticeable traces of it in his appearance.

For more information about Richard III, discovery of his remains, and the continuing analysis, please see:

*Full disclosure: the author of this post studied the pardons granted during the reign of Richard III and tends to take a sympathetic view of his legacy.