Nursing

This Month in History: Don’t Just Grin and Bear It

“A woman’s first responsibility is to make an effort to do what she wants to do.” —sage advice?áfrom?áDr. Winston Weese, Emeritus Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at LSU Medical School

You never know what you will chance upon when you browse the LibraryÔÇÖs Newspaper Clippings Collection. Trolling for this monthÔÇÖs topic took me on a journey through various strange perspectives on womenÔÇÖs health.

In 1959, convention speakers discussed ÔÇ£gyno-psychiatry,ÔÇØ ÔÇ£a very basic and superficial type of psychiatry [that] is primarily reassurance. Sometimes a woman is infertile because she believes her husband does not love her. Or vice versa. What we are trying to do today is to make the infertile woman realize that help is possible: that they donÔÇÖt have to just grin and bear it.ÔÇØ One article from 1961 blames men for womenÔÇÖs anxieties: ÔÇ£The American man isnÔÇÖt asserting his male dominance.ÔÇØ The piece is full of quotable gems like, ÔÇ£The wise woman of course, vocally credits her husband with leadership even when he does not have itÔÇØ and ÔÇ£boosts her husbandÔÇÖs ego even though she may be far superior to him in intelligence.ÔÇØ

Some answered the call for by entering the medical field.?áIn 1931, The Southern Medical Association fielded questions about the rise of women as doctors. At the time, women doctors still combated some suppositions about their patients: ÔÇ£Why should they be all women?ÔÇØ and about their personhood with ÔÇ£frequent assertions that such professions as social work and medicine destroy many of the gentler attributes of the feminine nature.ÔÇØ One of the doctors interviewed was the remarkable Dr. Moss of New Orleans, who said, ÔÇ£ThatÔÇÖs a lot of foolishness on the part of people who donÔÇÖt know us.ÔÇØ

Dr. Emma Sadler Moss rejected a teaching career because she was ÔÇ£not gentle enoughÔÇØ and stood as is a?áshining example?áof a woman doing what she wants. She brushed aside the hackneyed image of the young, gentle Southern woman, preferring the allure of the medical profession, where she excelled. After a stint as a medical technologist, Dr. Moss studied for her M. D., which she earned in 1935 from LSU. From there, she earned the title of Director of Pathology at Charity Hospital, clinical professor of pathology at LSU Medical School, and President of the American Society of Clinical Pathology (notably, the first woman President of the society).

Dr. MossÔÇÖ commitment to these institutions lasted for over thirty years until her death in 1970. She received numerous awards for her work in pathology including being recognized as the 1954 Medical Woman of the Year and as one of ÔÇ£The Six Most Successful Women of 1955.ÔÇØ The Library owns two editions of her lauded text, An Atlas of Medical Mycology, which she co-authored with Dr. Albert Louis McQuown. A full listing of her contributions to LSU Medical School and Charity Hospital can be viewed in A History of LSU School of Medicine New Orleans.

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the?áLouisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.

Free NOLA CARE Clinic with Volunteer Opportunities

On Wednesday, July 3rd from 8 am to 9 pm, the National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics (NAFC)?áwill host a one day free medical clinic?áat the Morial Convention Center. The clinic is still seeking medical (and non-medical) volunteers, including physicians, nurses, and students in those fields.

More Nursing and Allied Health Journals Available via CINAHL Complete!

 

The Library is pleased to announce that we now have CINAHL Complete! CINAHL Complete is EBSCOÔÇÖs most comprehensive access point for full-text nursing and allied health literature. It replaces CINAHL Plus with Full Text, but donÔÇÖt worry, you wonÔÇÖt have to learn how to use a new product; the look and functionality are the same. What is different is that now there are more?áfull-text journals?áand indexed titles.?á “How many?ámore?” you ask!?á Well,?áthere are over 550?ámore?áfull-text journals and over 150 additional indexed journals.?á In all, CINAHL Complete includes access to over 1,300 full-text journals and includes indexing for over 5,400 journals. Our subscription also includes over 130 Evidence-Based Care Sheets, 170 Continuing Education Modules, and more. To see a complete list of journals available, you can click on ÔÇ£PublicationsÔÇØ at the top of the CINAHL Complete screen.

 

LSUHSC-NO faculty, staff, and students can access CINAHL Complete on or off campus. Visit our CINAHL Complete electronic resource page for more information: http://www.lsuhsc.edu/no/library/ss&d/data/cinahl.html.?á?á

Remember, many of the core journals are listed in the library catalog, INNOPAC, and you can link directly to a journal?áand browse available issues from there, too.?á And all these journals are listed in our EBSCO A to Z list.

For further assistance searching CINAHL Complete, contact a reference librarian on duty.

Popular health topics of 2012

Last week, MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine and National Institute of Health’s consumer health database, published the top 10 most?ávisited health topic searches?áof 2012:

Looking at these searches, it would seem that the public are?ásearching for information on?áthe most common health?áthreats in the?áUnited States.?á?áAccording to the Mayo Clinic, the top seven threats to women’s health are?áheart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, accidents, and type 2 diabetes. The top seven threats to men’s health are similar:?áheart disease, cancer, accidents, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and suicide.

Of course the most visited sites could also mean that people who were diagnosed with high blood pressure and diabetes started exercising?ábut they had trouble breathing, had heart palpitations,?ágot sunburned, and hurt their backs!

Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program Grant

The LSUHSC School of Nursing has been awarded a $700,000 grant by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Health Resources and Services Administration. The grant will fund students who are pursuing degrees in the Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program. “Money can be used for tuition, books, fees, and reasonable living expenses,” according to the alert released by the Office of Information Services. Full-time students who meet eligibility requirements may receive up to $22,000 from the grant.

Hidden Treasures: NLM

Book Cover

 

It was always exciting to go digging around in your grandparent’s attic as a kid. You never know what you might find; old photos, love letters and toys, maybe a treasure map to lost pirate gold.

Imagine if you got to dig around in all the old stuff the National Library of Medicine has laying around. Now you can catch a glimpse of their weird, wacky and wonderful collection.

Hidden Treasure: The National Library of Medicine is a beautiful and fascinating new book. Check out a New York Times review or have a look yourself. The book is available in the Isch?® Library stacks and as an EBook online from NLM.


 

JBI COnNECT+ makes your job easier

Did you know that our School of Nursing is the only JoAnna Briggs Institute affiliate center in Louisiana? Through this affiliation we implement the Louisiana Center for Evidence Based Nursing at LSUHSC-NO School of Nursing: An Affiliate Center of the Joanna Briggs Institute.?á ?áThe Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) is an international not-for-profit, membership based, research and development organisation based within the within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Adelaide, South Australia.

One of the main ways JBI supports nursing research is by providing ?áthe best available evidence to inform clinical decision-making at the point of care. Watch this video to see how JBI COnNECT+ can make your life easier.

For more information on JBI?áCOnNECT+ and evidence-based nursing, contact Mary Marix, School of Nursing?áLibrary?áLiaison, or the?áOffice of Nursing Research and Evaluation.

BSN Graduate Featured in TP

Amanda Hill, May 2012 graduate of the School of Nursing, was featured in Sheila Stroup‘s column yesterday in the Times Picayune newspaper.?á The column highlighted Hill’s struggle to become a nurse. Congratulations to her (and her entire class) for fulfilling their dreams.

Nursing Jobs???

The November/December 2011 issue of the publication Dean’s Notes has an interesting article reporting the number of recent RN graduates who have been unable to find jobs in nursing. Don’t like what you are reading? Critique the author’s research methodology.

Wow! $4.3M to School of Nursing

New Orleans City Business reported today that the LSUHSC School of Nursing has received $4.3 million in federal grants from the Department of Health and Human Services. Congratulations SoN!

SoN Awarded Best School for Men

Congratulations to the LSUHSC School of Nursing for being named one of the best schools for men who wish to prepare themselves for a nursing career. This award is given by the American Assembly for Men in Nursing (http://aamn.org). LSUHSC SoN shares the 2010 honors with Duke University, the University of Pennsylvania and Samuel Merrit University. This award recognizes ÔÇ£a nursing school or college that has provided significant efforts in recruiting and retaining men in nursing, in providing men a supportive educational environment, and in educating faculty, students and the community about the contributions men have and do make to the nursing profession.ÔÇØ

2010 America’s Health Rankings

ahrLogo
America’s Health Rankings?« has been tracking the state of our nation’s health for over 20 years. This analysis provides a comprehensive perspective on our national health issues, state by state.

America’s Health Rankings?«-2010 Edition shows Vermont at the top of the list of healthiest states again this year. Massachusetts is ranked second this year, an improvement from ranking third last year. New Hampshire is number three, followed by Connecticut and Hawaii. However, although Mississippi is 50th and the least healthy state, Louisiana is 49th. Arkansas, Nevada and Oklahoma complete the bottom five states.

Louisiana dropped two spots from last year due to several factors including a high rate of obesity and smoking. On the positive side, Louisiana has a high ranking for access to prenatal care and childhood immunizations. Stay Healthy, Louisiana has a great summary of the state’s ranking.

Healthy People 2020 Launched

Healthy People 2020 logo

Healthy People provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. For 3 decades, Healthy People has established benchmarks and monitored progress over time in order to encourage collaborations across sectors, guide individuals toward making informed health decisions, and measure the impact of prevention activities.

Healthy People 2020 continues in this tradition with the launch on December 2, 2010 of its ambitious, yet achievable, 10-year agenda for improving the NationÔÇÖs health. Healthy People 2020 is the result of a multiyear process that reflects input from a diverse group of individuals and organizations.

New topic areas for 2020 include:
Adolescent Health
Blood Disorders and Blood Safety
Dementias, Including AlzheimerÔÇÖs Disease
Early and Middle Childhood
Genomics
Global Health
Healthcare-Associated Infections
Health-Related Quality of Life and Well-Being
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health
Older Adults
Preparedness
Sleep Health
Social Determinants of Health

Stay connected to Healthy People 2020 by signing up for e-mail, following on Twitter, connecting on LinkedIn, or joining the Consortium to stay up-to-date with the latest Healthy People information and events.

Preparing Students for Best Jobs

Money Magazine came out with it’s list The 50 Best Jobs in America in the November issue. LSUHSC New Orleans is preparing its students for many of these.
#4 Physical Therapist
#12 Dentist
#13 Nurse Anesthetist
#19 Occupational Therapist
#25 Emergency Room Physician
#27 Director of Nursing
#29 Psychiatrist
#34 Primary Care Physician
#44 Speech-Language Pathologist
#46 Physical Therapy Director

Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries

African American surgeons, nurses and hospital staff have often been slighted in recognition of providing care for soldiers and civilians during the Civil War. Despite the challenges they faced due to race and gender, they simply downplayed the prejudices?áand carried out their duties as healers and caregivers.?á?áIn hopes to change that, a 6-banner traveling exhibit is making its way around different cities in the U.S. The fight for freedom seemed to be a family affair as some nurses served alongside their relatives. While the war showed opportunity for some, those who received a stipend, others were sent into the field by their owners who kept the money for themselves. One notable mention in the exhibit is Susie King Taylor, who served as a caregiver on the battlefield, yet didnÔÇÖt receive any compensation for her work.

To find a location near you, check out the traveling exhibition. If none are offered locally explore the exhibition online through the educational resources.