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Thursday, August 28, 2014   4:15 AM   |   81°F

Phillips, Holland T.

Faculty Publications May Display

The Library’s Faculty Publications display, located on the first floor of the Library, has been updated with eight new articles for the months of May and June. The new article array covers topics from alcohol intoxication’s impact on spinal injuries, to the linkage between schizophrenia and chronic LSD usage, to nursing in catastrophe.

LSUHSC-NO authors are shown in bold print:

  1. Crutcher CL, Ugiliweneza B, Hodes JE, Kong M, Boakye M. Alcohol intoxication and its effects on traumatic spinal cord injury outcomes. J Neurotrauma. 2014.
  2. Hong S, Alapure BV, Lu Y, Tian H, Wang Q. 12/15-lipoxygenase deficiency reduces densities of mesenchymal stem cells in the dermis of wounded and unwounded skin. Br J Dermatol. 2014.
  3. Leblanc KG, Jr, Monheit GD. Understanding and use of the American Joint Committee on Cancer seventh edition guidelines for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: A survey of dermatologic surgeons. Dermatol Surg. 2014.
  4. Martin DA, Marona-Lewicka D, Nichols DE, Nichols CD. Chronic LSD alters gene expression profiles in the mPFC relevant to schizophrenia. Neuropharmacology. 2014.
  5. Molina PE, Amedee AM, Lecapitaine NJ, Zabaleta J, Mohan M, Winsauer P, Vande Stouwe C, McGoey R, Auten MW, Lamotte L, Chandra LC, Birke L. Modulation of gut-specific mechanisms by chronic Delta9-THC administration in male rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus: A systems biology analysis. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2014.
  6. Park EP, Boulmay BC. Images in clinical medicine. herpes labialis and facial-nerve paralysis. N Engl J Med. 2014 ;370(11):1048.
  7. Polhemus DJ, Lefer DJ. Emergence of hydrogen sulfide as an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule in cardiovascular disease. Circ Res. 2014; 114(4):730-737.
  8. Sterling YM. Nursing ‘caring’ during catastrophic events: Theoretical, research, and clinical insights. Int J Human Caring. 2014; 18(1):60-65.

These articles are part of the Library’s Faculty Publications Database, which is maintained by Reference Librarian, Kathy Kerdolff. The database includes publications authored by LSUHSC-New Orleans faculty, researchers, and students since 1998. It is updated weekly with new articles harvested from a variety of citation sources: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL, etc.

The display highlights sixteen articles at a time, rotating eight new articles each month. You can find more information about the database and listings for our current and past displays from Library’s Faculty Publications landing page: http://www.lsuhsc.edu/library/databases/facpubs.aspx.

To add your faculty publications to the database and display, or for questions about either, please contact Kathy Kerdolff.

Essay Contest for Louisiana Youth

The Office of Community and Minority Health Education at LSUHSC School of Medicine is now accepting entries for their essay contest: “What does being healthy mean to me?” The goal of this contest is to allow the children of South Louisiana “to exercise their natural inquisitive nature in exploring health and healthcare policy issues.”

Entries postmarked no later than May 9, 2014 will be accepted and the winners announced on May 17, 2014. First place winner will receive $750; second place winner will receive $500; third place winner will receive $250.

For eligibility and entry guidelines on words count requirements, submission address, judging breakdown, and contest entry form, please refer to http://www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu/essaycontest/.

An informational video has also been posted on YouTube:

Sponsors for this contest include the LSU Healthcare Network in partnership with LiveWell Louisiana and Winn-Dixie.

Alert! New Faculty Publications on Display!

FacPubPicOur Faculty Publications display, located on the first floor of the Library, has been updated with eight new articles for the months of April and May. The new article array includes several LSUHSC departments such as Occupational Therapy, Psychiatry, and Anesthesiology, and covers topics from sun protection to childhood obesity and parathyriodectomy.

LSUHSC-NO authors are shown in bold print:

  1. Diaz JH. Updates for responsible sun exposure behavior and photoprotection in the south. J La State Med Soc. 2013; 165(5):277-282.
  2. Doucet BM. Quantifying function: Status critical. Am J Occup Ther. 2014; 68(2):123-126.
  3. Garvey CE, McGowin CL, Foster TP. Development and evaluation of SYBR green-I based quantitative PCR assays for herpes simplex virus type whole transcriptome analysis. J Virol Methods. 2014.
  4. Kaliebe K. Rules of thumb: Three simple ideas for overcoming the complex problem of childhood obesity. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014; 53(4):385-387.e1.
  5. Kanotra SP, Kuriloff DB, Vyas PK. A simplified approach to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy. Laryngoscope. 2014.
  6. Kaye AD. Critical care medicine and the emerging challenges of dietary supplements, including herbal products*. Crit Care Med. 2014; 42(4):1014-1016.
  7. Kerut KD, Kerut EK. Echo diagnosis of rheumatic tricuspid valve disease. Echocardiography. 2014. *Echo clips available here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/echo.12532/suppinfo.*
  8. Musa F, Martinez JA, Hebert C, Safley M, Smith D, Lopez F. Clinical case of the month: Altered mental status and headache in a young man. Journal of the Louisiana State Medical Society. 2014; (Jan/Feb).

These articles are part of the Library’s Faculty Publications Database, which is maintained by Reference Librarian, Kathy Kerdolff. The database includes publications authored by LSUHSC-New Orleans faculty, researchers, and students since 1998. It is updated weekly with new articles harvested from a variety of citation sources: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL, etc.

The display highlights sixteen articles at a time, rotating eight new articles each month. You can find more information about the database and listings for our current and past displays from Library’s Faculty Publications landing page: http://www.lsuhsc.edu/library/databases/facpubs.aspx.

To add your faculty publications to the database and display, or for questions about either, please contact Kathy Kerdolff.

Computer Lab Now Available for Online Student Testing

The Library Lab, located on our fourth floor, houses fourteen computers for student use. We are proud to announce that those computers are now enabled for use with Respondus Lockdown browser, which gives students the ability to complete online testing in a private browser.

uTip: Text Emergency Alert System

This week, LSU Health Sciences Center introduced an emergency reporting service that will allow faculty, staff, and students to send text messages to University Police in order to facilitate the reporting of crime, to help prevent crime, and to allow police faster and more accurate information.

Subscription and registration with campus emergency alerts is not necessary. Users can simply send a message to 50911 with a text beginning “LSUHSC” in order to notify University Police of emergencies, crimes, and suspicious activities or persons in the area. Normal text message rates assigned by cell phone providers will apply.

Users may also contact University Police with non-emergency information at 568-8270 or via online message at http://www.is.lsuhsc.edu/police/response.htm.

The graphic below provides more detailed information about this service from http://www.lsuhsc.edu/alerts/utip.aspx.

TO SEND A TIP

  1. TEXT 50911 and begin your message with LSUHSC

    • University Police will not be notified If your text does not begin with LSUHSC

  2. You will receive a text to notify you that the text has been received by uTip

 

Sample uTip Message

UTip Sample Image

Spring 2014 Library Bulletin Published

Want to know what’s new at the Libraries??áThis season’s edition of the Library Newsletter?áincludes special announcements, upcoming introductory classes on Library resources and the RefWorks citation manager, staff news, and articles on Dental Library shelf repairs, the new Libraries webpage, and updates on our available resources.

Our past issues are also available for viewing through our archives, which include Library newsletters from 1998 to the present.

Introducing VisualDx: A New Tool for Clinicians

Thanks to the School of Medicine Office of Student Technology, LSUHSC now has access to a new web-based clinical application designed to aid in visual diagnosis and patient education.

VisualDx?á allows point-of-care assistance for the user. The differential builder, diagnosis search, and medication search provide the information necessary to compare symptoms, visual cues, diagnosis, and treatment options. The VisualDx image bank contains over 25,000 medical images of diseases of the skin, hair, nails, eyes, lungs, etc. and shows variations by age, skin type, and stage.

You can watch a video overview of the application here:?áhttp://www.visualdx.com/features/video-overview.

Access to VisualDx is currently available through August 2014 for use on campus as well as off-campus for those with remote access privileges.?áSupported browsers are Internet Explorer 7+, Google Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. VisualDx also supports mobile wireless devices with a 3G or 4G connection.

Testing, Testing: PubMed Commons Community Forum

PubMed Commons, a new forum community created for online collaboration for ÔÇ£constructive criticism and discussion of scientific issues,ÔÇØ has introduced a pilot version.

During its closed pilot phase, PubMed Commons will be allowing accounts using approved email addresses from PubMed authors to participate. ?áNIH or Wellcome Trust grant recipients can also join and invite others to join. You can test whether you have access here http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedcommons/join/. Users will also need a My NCBI account.

Find answers to frequently asked questions on this page: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedcommons/faq/.

Street Closures This Weekend

 

Here are this weekend’s street closures as reported by Associate Vice Chancellor John Ball:

“From Friday morning, October 11, at 7:00 am through Monday evening, October 14, South Roman Street will be closed at Gravier Street.?á Access to and from the Roman St. Garage will only be available from Tulane Avenue.?á No one will be able to enter the intersection of South Roman Street and Gravier Street during this closure.?á The street is being closed by the Sewerage & Water Board to facilitate sewer repairs and paving in the intersection.

Thank you for your patience.”

Upcoming “Introduction to RefWorks” Class

Are you searching for a better way to manage your resources and have no idea where to start? We have the solution for you!

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Next Wednesday, October 16th, from noon to 1pm, the Isch?® Library will be offering an introductory Refworks class. Refworks, a web-based bibliography and citation manager supported by the Library, is a useful tool for organizing your online references. If you’d like to familiarize yourself with Refworks before attending the class, please visit :?áhttp://www.lsuhsc.edu/no/library/services/refworks.html.
The class will be held in the Library’s computer classroom on the 4th floor of the Resource Center Building on October 16th from noon to 1pm.
Anyone associated with the LSU Health Sciences Center and interested in getting started with RefWorks should definitely plan to attend.
Please contact the instructor, Head Dental Librarian Julie Schiavo, via email at jschia@lsuhsc.edu or by phone at 504-941-8162.

Civil War Medicine Exhibit Moves to the Dental Library

The “Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine” exhibit from the National Library of Medicine has moved to the Dental Library and will be available for viewing ?áuntil October 18.

The Library resources tie-ins are also displayed at the Dental Library. These items include exhibit brochures, circulating books, and excerpts from the Reserve and Reference collections.

Helpful links and educational resources provided by the National Library of Medicine in conjunction with the exhibit include?álesson plans?áfor upper elementary and high school classes, a?áhigher education module?áwith instructor resources,?áonline activities, and a?ábibliography?áof additional readings.

Be sure to stop in and get a taste of history!

Dental Library hours are Sunday: 11:30 am – 8:00 pm,?áMonday through Thursday: 8:00 am – 8:00 pm, and?áFriday: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm. The Library is closed on Saturdays.

Library Hosts Fascinating Exhibit on Civil War Medicine

The LSU Health Sciences Center Library is proud to announce that we will be hosting the traveling National Library of Medicine exhibition “Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine.” The display will be set up in the Library Commons until October 4, after which it will move to the Dental Library until October 18.

While African Americans were generally untrained and untested in the medical field at that time, as many hands as could be found were necessary to accommodate the influx of ailing and wounded on the battlefield and in hospitals. African Americans were “hired” or compelled into the medical field as hospital attendants, nurses, surgeons, and staff members in manufacturing laboratories. Many admirable leaders emerged as a result: Charles Burleigh Purvis, Susie King Taylor, Anderson R. Abbott, Alexander T. Augusta, and Harriet Tubman.

Helpful links and educational resources provided by the National Library of Medicine in conjunction with the exhibit include lesson plans for upper elementary and high school classes, a higher education module with instructor resources, online activities, and a bibliography of additional readings.

Library resources that will complement further study of African American roles in the Civil War for both the Union and the Confederacy are listed below. Reference Librarians (available Monday to Thursday from 8am to 8pm, and Friday 8am to 4pm) will be happy to assist with research as well.

Our supplementary materials cover a number of texts: The Paths We Tread: Blacks in Nursing Worldwide, Louisiana in the Confederacy, Doctors in Gray: The Confederate Medical Service, Doctors in Blue: The Medical History of the Union Army in the Civil War, and The Plain Peoples of the Confederacy. Library patrons may also browse our list of E-Resources, a compilation of links to databases and other online resources like African American Firsts in Science and Technology and African American Soldiers in the Civil War and Colors of Courage: Gettysburg’s Forgotten History: Immigrants, Women & African Americans in the Civil War.

The exhibit will be at the John P. Isch?® Library from September 16-October 4 and at the Dental Library from October 7-18, so be sure to stop in!

Library Commons Closed This Evening

Please be advised that due to a scheduled domestic water outage for hot water system improvements, the Library Commons on the third floor of the Resource Center will be closed today (Friday, September from 6pm to 9pm. During this time, there will be no water in the restrooms and water fountains.

The Library will close as usual at 6 pm on Friday and reopen Saturday morning at 9:30 am.

This Month in History: Putting Mind over Matter

Ever been hypnotized? While it may not make you cluck like a chicken, as an alternative therapy, medical hypnosis might help you manage and overcome a number of physical and mental conditions. In the fall of 1959, a few brave medical students were willing to put their bodies and minds at the mercy of LSU Medical School Professor of psychiatry Dr. Carl L. Davis for the purpose of studying the viability of hypnotherapy. Later, the students would be given the opportunity to reverse the stakes and hypnotize Dr. Davis in the spirit of fairness.

The American Medical Association officially backed medical hypnosis for wide use in 1958, though they cautioned against using the method as a form of entertainment and in cases of severe psychological illness. At that time, medical and dental practices used hypnotherapy as a form of anesthesia and in the management of pain. Other fields of medicine that have found use for hypnotherapeutic procedure include dermatology, gastroenterology, cardiology, obstetrics, oncology, post-surgery recovery, and even in the treatment of smoking addiction, eating disorders, and psychosomatic illness through age regression.

While many remain skeptical about the efficacy of hypnotherapy, it is true that more research and standardization of practice will provide insight into the relative benefits and risks of its usage. Dangers to the patient and the doctor are a considerable cause for concern. The mind, being a vast and complex entity, requires a delicate but firm touch. Hypnotism provides the therapist with the ability to wield the power of suggestion over the patient, and so puts the receptive patient in a vulnerable position. For this reason, the move toward more holistic treatment of the individual is vital in addressing his or her needs.

A 1959 Times-Picayune article relates the case of a man who developed asthma every time his mother-in-law would announce her intention to visitÔÇöÔÇ£This man just cannot understand why this would happen since he honestly believes he is fond of [her].ÔÇØ This is an example of a symptom that could possibly benefit from hypnotherapy (or else a nice, long vacation).

Accounts of hypnotism can turn grim, however. In another instance, a patient suffering from self-destructive tendencies developed paralysis in one of her fingers. She was referred to a hypnotist, who alleviated the symptom without addressing the underlying psychological turmoil. Upon release, the woman promptly employed her newly-flexible trigger finger in one final act of self-harm. This is an extreme example, but speaks to the necessity of treating the patient as a whole and of recognizing links between physical and mental manifestations of illness.

The prominent physicians mentioned in these newspaper articles were Professors of psychiatry at LSU Medical School: Dr. Carl L. Davis, Dr. Lucio Gatto, and Dr. Charles Watkins, who also served as the Head of the department. All of them make a few appearances in our Digital Collections as subject and even creator. Dr. Davis appears for his addresses on teen drinking and middle-age rebellion. Dr. Gatto appears for his study on compulsive borrowing. Dr. Watkins is the most prolific figure for his interest in the history of the U. S. Army 64th General Hospital, which has its own Collection, as well as for his medical-cultural mission to Central America, and his role in the care (and commitment) of former Governor Earl K. Long.

Now a far cry from its historic roots in mesmerism and animal magnetism, the current practice of medical hypnosis can be aligned more closely with deep meditation and positive thinking, the power of which is widely acknowledged by doctors and patients alike.

Glimpse of the Past is an ongoing project to promote the Louisiana Digital Library effort. This Month in History will present for your reading pleasure a closer look into a newspaper clipping of note from our Digital Collections and articles relating to the LSU Medical School.